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Locals assemble to aid 2020 census efforts

By Hugo Vera

 

With the 2020 census only a couple of months away, the Fremont City Council is making a plethora of efforts to garner as much participation from Fremont residents as possible. Preparations for Fremont’s participation in the 2020 census began last summer when Fremont City Council passed a resolution to allocate funds and personnel toward a census task force. The city also hosted a “census kickoff” event in December as a means of inviting the public to embrace the 24th American census.

 

Spearheading the census efforts for the city of Fremont is management analyst Amanda Gallo. She and other civil servants serving in the 2020 Census task force appointed by the city want to make all residents feel heard and valued with this monumental collection of data.

 

“We want is to make sure everyone’s voice is heard. Even if you’re not a citizen of this country, if you live and work here you are still a part of this community and you deserve to have your voice heard,” says Gallo.

 

While the U.S. Census Bureau has stated that the majority of their data should be collected electronically on April 1, Gallo states that Fremont residents will start receiving paper materials pertaining to the census via mail as early as mid-March.

 

“Ideally, everyone should have their surveys done by April at the latest but we’ll be receiving and turning in data up until July,” adds Gallo.

 

To ensure citizens are informed of the census and what it entails in the language of their preference, the city will hold a series of census workshops at the Fremont Family Resource Center located on 39155 Liberty Street. Trained volunteers will be available to help translate survey documents and to inform residents of the census’ importance.

 

“One thing we want people who are hesitant to participate to know is that your information is confidential. There’s not going to be a citizenship question and this is just used to help decide federal budgets,” emphasizes Gallo. The controversy surrounding a possible “citizenship question” in the census has been at the forefront of national news. Despite orders from the Trump Administration to require citizenship questions in census surveys within the contiguous 48 states, the Supreme Court ruled in October 2018 that requiring such a question is unconstitutional.

 

“We stand here with a message for the immigrants of Alameda County: you belong and you count! We need you to complete the census so our community gets the resources we all deserve,” said Alameda County District 4 Supervisor Nate Miley in an online statement following the ruling.

 

Citizens who want to volunteer in the census-taking efforts can also access the Alameda County website’s census page to learn how they can become official census ambassadors. Volunteers who contact county representatives will be given training, documents and other materials in the weeks leading up to the March kickoff. “With the way our city is growing we need everyone’s voices to be heard because that way we get the funding we need,” concludes Gallo. “Fremont is a very diverse city and we want our census to reflect that.”

 

 

Ohlone’s new Academic Core

By Roelle Balan

 

For students who attended Ohlone College’s Fremont campus in the past ten years, listening to construction noises and struggling to find your way to and from class along a maze of fences was just part of school life. Those days are now over. Academic Core buildings were unveiled to the public at a ribbon cutting ceremony on Friday, January 24, 2020. These three buildings – Science Center, Arts and Learning Commons – are the largest construction projects on the Fremont campus.

 

The buildings were primarily funded by Measure G, also known as Proposition 39, that passed with 63% approval by voters on November 2, 2010. The $345 million bond was used for renovations on the Newark and Fremont campus; largely on $197,211,600 construction costs of the Academic Core Complex.

 

In 2008, during the Great Recession, Ohlone suffered a 7.8% cut in state funding. Dr. Gari Browning became president and superintendent of Ohlone Community College District in that year as the district was close to losing its accreditation; it was given approximately four months to submit a report outlining corrective actions. “The college community and the board went to work immediately to resolve the issues and the sanction was lifted at the earliest possible moment,” said Browning. Ohlone College received an affirmation of its accreditation in 2015.

 

The decision to renovate academic buildings started with a collaborative effort to think of what an ideal campus would look like. “Faculty, staff, and students gathered frequently to consider the existing conditions of the campus, our space needs, projected enrollment, parking, pedestrian circulation, opportunity for engagement across the campus community,” Browning said. “We focused on keeping high demand, high need classes to protect students from the reductions to the extent we could,” Browning said.

 

Donations by Frank DiMino, Fremont Bank Foundation, the CIO Scholarship Fund, and personal contributions from Judy Chong and Victoria and James Maroulis to help fund the Academic Core Buildings. The largest donation – $9.8 million – came from DiMino, an East Coast real estate developer and retired contractor, in November 2018. According to Newark Mayor Emeritus David Smith, a portion of the fund will be used for student scholarships. The donation is one of the largest received by a California Community College. Fremont Bank contributed $500,000 that will be used for technology, lab equipment and furnishings.

 

Joel Heyne, Senior Project Executive of Gilbane Building Company said he and his team started working with the college on the Academic Core Buildings in 2012. Echoing the sentiments of many in the community who value the presence of a quality institution of higher learning in their midst, he noted, “The Ohlone community is large and very supportive, and for this we are very, very grateful.”

 

Wednesday, Feb 12

Fremont Police community meeting
6:30 p.m.

Update on crime, major cases and highlights from 2019
Fremont City Council Chambers

3300 Capitol Ave., Fremont

(510) 790-6689

Mleon@fremont.gov

 

 

Workers criticize Amazon on climate despite risk to jobs

By Barbara Ortutay

AP Technology Writer

 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Jan 26 – Hundreds of employees are openly criticizing Amazon's record on climate change despite what they say is a company policy that puts their jobs at risk for speaking out.

 

On Sunday, more than 300 employees of the online retail giant signed their names and job titles to statements on a blog post on Medium. The online protest was organized by a group called Amazon Employees For Climate Justice, an advocacy group founded by Amazon workers that earlier this month said the company had sent letters to its members threatening to fire them if they continued to speak to the press.

 

“It's our moral responsibility to speak up, and the changes to the communications policy are censoring us from exercising that responsibility,“ said Sarah Tracy, a software development engineer at Amazon, in a statement.

 

Amazon did not immediately respond to messages for comment on Sunday.

 

Amazon, which relies on fossil fuels to power the planes, trucks and vans that ship packages all over the world, has an enormous carbon footprint. And Amazon workers have been vocal in criticizing some of the company's practices.

 

Last year, more than 8,000 staffers signed an open letter to CEO and founder Jeff Bezos demanding that Amazon cut its carbon emissions, end its use of fossil fuels and stop its work with oil companies that use Amazon's technology to locate fossil fuel deposits.

––

 

AP Business Writer Joseph Pisani contributed to this story from New York.

 

 

BART Police Log

Submitted by Les Mensinger and BART PD

 

Saturday, January 25

  • At 10:02 a.m. a man identified by police as Ralph Williams, 35, of Oakland was arrested at Warm Springs/South Fremont station on two outstanding warrants issued by BART police for possession of two controlled substances. He was booked into Santa Rita Jail.

 

Tuesday, January 28

  • At 9:25 p.m. officers responded to a report about a person found unresponsive on the platform at Bay Fair station in San Leandro. Despite CPR efforts by officers and responding medical personnel, the person was declared dead at 9:58 p.m. The Alameda County Coroner’s Office removed the body. An initial investigation determined there was no foul play suspected in the incident.

 

Monday, January 27

  • At 11:08 a.m. a man identified by police as Marche Hayes, 22, of Oakland was arrested at Warm Springs/South Fremont station on a $10,000 warrant for petty theft and grand theft issued by Richmond Police Department. He was booked into Fremont City Jail.

 

  • At 1:04 p.m. a man identified by police as Dustin Friday, 31, was arrested at San Leandro station on a $15,000 warrant issued for possessing drug paraphernalia issued by Palo Alto Police Department. He was booked into Santa Rita Jail.

 

Wednesday, January 29

  • At 8:09 p.m. a man identified by police as Cole Williamson, 22, was arrested at Castro Valley station on suspicion of possessing a controlled substance and possession of methamphetamine. He was booked into Santa Rita Jail.

 

 

A romantic run along the Bay

Submitted by Brazen Racing

 

Known for its romantic vistas of San Francisco and the Bay, our “Bay Breeze Race” sets the stage for romance, whether you are in love with running or not. Hikers/walkers are always welcome!

 

All race distances start and finish at the San Leandro Marina Park. Whether you are a frequent race winner or a first-time runner/walker, you’ve got a lot to look forward to. All participants will enjoy a mostly-flat, easy bayside trail that rarely strays more than a few feet from water. A perfect course for those looking to set a personal record! The half marathon distance will have pacers thanks to the TriValley Running Club; make sure to check out the pacer page for more details!

 

All runners will receive custom finisher medals and custom shirts (cotton and tech shirts available). Age group awards will be awarded to the top three finishers in five age categories (less for the younger ages). All races will be professionally timed with bib-tag timing.

 

Water stations will be fully stocked with water, sports drink, gels, pretzels, candy, etc. Approximate water station locations are Mile 1.25 for 5K; Miles 1.5, 2.9, 3.25 and 4.68 for 10K; and Miles 1.5, 2.9, 6.5, 10.2 and 11.6 for Half Marathon. Those needing water more frequently are encouraged to carry a water bottle or hydration pack.

 

The Half Marathon will start at 8:00 am and the course will have a time limit of 4.5 hours. Runners must reach the 4th aid station (mile 10) by 11:30 am (20+ minute per mile pace).

For Half Marathon participants who wish to hike the course and take more than 4.5 hours, we will offer a “Hiker Division” start at 7:30 am. Those starting early should carry water as the first and second aid stations might not be 100% up and running, depending on the hiker’s speed. Hiker starts will not be eligible to win the race or for age group awards, but will be listed as official finishers in the Hiker Division and will still receive finisher medals.

 

Double your running pleasure and accomplishment with a second bayside run just two weeks later! The Breeze to Victory (B2V) Double includes two races along the bay and one “mega medal” composed of the finisher medal from each with the special middle medal only for those completing both races. Race #1 is the Bay Breeze Half Marathon starting at the San Leandro Marina. Race #2 is the Victory Half Marathon/10K/5K. No special registration is needed. Runners may participate in any race category at either race.

 

Register online through February 14. Registration is $45 – 84.

 

Bay Breeze Race

Saturday, Feb 15

8 a.m.

San Leandro Marina Park

14001 Monarch Bay Dr., San Leandro

https://brazenracing.com/baybreeze/

 

Victory Race

Saturday, Feb 29

8 a.m.

Richmond Marina Bay

19 Marina Lakes Dr., Richmond

Home

 

 

Honoring real estate professionals

Submitted by David Stark

 

Several local real estate professionals have been selected to receive the Bay East Association of REALTORS®’ (Bay East) highest honors for their achievements during 2019. This year’s recipients were recognized at the 2020 Bay East Inaugural event at Casa Real in Pleasanton on January 10. The winners demonstrated high ethical standards and professionalism, active community involvement and a high level of service to the real estate profession.

 

REALTOR® of the Year

Carl Medford with Keller Williams Benchmark received the REALTOR® of the Year award for demonstrating the highest level of integrity and commitment to Bay East and the real estate profession. He is a licensed general contractor, a frequent speaker about real estate issues, a featured author for Inman.com and writes the “Real Estate Reality” columns in the Castro Valley Forum and San Leandro Times. He serves on the Board of Directors for the Streets of Hope international charity that provides support for children in need.

 

Rookie of the Year

Frank Quismorio with Realty Experts in Fremont received the Rookie of the Year Award. He has participated in events for the Bay East Young Professionals Network, the Filipino American Real Estate Professional Association, and the Asian Real Estate of America. He will serve as the 2020 vice chairman of the Tri-Cities Marketing Committee.

 

Outstanding Leader Award

Otto Catrina with Catrina Real Estate in Castro Valley received the Outstanding Leader Award. This award is given to a past president of the association who continues to pursue the vision of excellence in the name of Bay East. He speaks on a regular basis about leadership opportunities and responsibilities to audiences across the country and is a candidate for the 2021 C.A.R. President-Elect.

 

Other recipients include Ed Gomes with Pride Properties in Livermore, John Deadrich Distinguished Service Award; and George Johnson with Cherry Creek Mortgage, Affiliate of the Year.

 

 

Takes from Silicon Valley East

Incentivizing Sustainable Business Practices
By Carolina Miranda, founder, Cultivating Capital

 

Carolina Miranda is the founder of Cultivating Capital and can help your small business improve its sustainability practices. As a consultant with the Alameda County Green Business Program, she has helped hundreds of small-to-medium sized businesses throughout the county reduce waste, conserve water, minimize pollution, and save energy.

 

What is the Alameda County Green Business Program?

The Alameda County Green Business Program is an independently operated program that is supported by the statewide California Green Business Network and local program partners, including the cities and utilities in Alameda County. The program assists local businesses in implementing environmentally friendly practices by providing recommendations, resources, and assistance. Certified Green Businesses exceed all environmental regulation, and implement practices to reduce pollution, conserve resources, and protect human health.

 

What is an example of a typical decision and implementation process for certifying as a Green Business in Fremont?

Businesses choose to get certified for a variety of reasons, but many of them feel that it aligns with their values. The most important decision that a business needs to make is to commit to the process as an opportunity for learning and improvement. For the implementation, each business will need to complete a checklist with all the practices in key categories including energy, transportation, solid waste, pollution, and water conservation.

 

The checklist includes core requirements, such as having energy efficient lighting, as well as elective measures, such as using Energy Star printers. In addition, a business must be in compliance with any applicable environmental regulations such as for hazardous materials management. You can view the checklist options by scrolling to the bottom of https://greenbusinessca.org/about-us/ and selecting your business type.

 

Businesses receive personal attention from the Green Business Program, public agencies and utilities in each of these focus areas. Every business that gets certified learns about opportunities for improvement, and the program is designed to support the businesses throughout this process. They’re not expected to do it on their own! Once your business is certified, the certification is valid for four years, after which time a business can recertify for another four years.

 

Certification benefits include access to the Green Business Program logo for use in print and online marketing, a marketing toolkit with graphics and social media posts, a listing in the statewide directory of Green Businesses, invitations to local Green Business networking events, and a quarterly newsletter with information about award and rebate opportunities. The City of Fremont also recognizes all new and recertified businesses annually at a public city council meeting.

 

What kinds of businesses have received the certification in Fremont?

There are a wide variety of certified Green Businesses in Fremont. They range from environmentally conscious brands, such as REI, dentist offices, IT firms, and dry cleaners. Any small to medium-sized business can implement eco-conscious processes as a value-add to their operations, creating a win-win for their bottom line and the environment.

 

Here are a few examples that show the range of local businesses that make a commitment to sustainability:

 

  • “We are a progressive and dynamic dental practice and this philosophy applies to all facets, so it only made sense that we move and become a Green Certified. Our actions help the environment and all of us will benefit, and because we lead the way, we help impact and influence others.” ~Rodney J. Chew, DDS – Chew Dental Group
  • “The Little Mud Puddle’s leads by example as a green certified school. We teach our children at a young age about recycling, water conservation and reuse of items, instead of adding to landfill disposal and wasting. The green environmental concepts established at our school enable our children to adopt friendly environmental habits which will continue into their adulthood.” ~Darlene J., The Little Mud Puddles Learning Center, Inc.
  • “Bjork Construction obtained Green Business Certification so that we could be a better advocate for the community and our clients. Doing so helps us do our part to create a better environment and world.” ~Alyssa G., Bjork Construction

 

What exciting things does the program have in store for 2020?

$500 rebates. Businesses often ask how much it costs to get certified as a Green Business. The program itself doesn’t charge a certification fee, but there are sometimes costs involved related to making upgrades. The California Green Business Network currently has funds available to help businesses offset these costs and receive Green Business Certification. Not only can a business get certified at no cost, but it can get money to help meet the program standards! This is a unique and time-sensitive opportunity. You can learn more about the program here: https://greenbusinessca.org/AlamedaCounty/Rebate

 

Where can I learn more about applying to be a Green business?

Email me at carolinam@cultivatingcapital.com or check out our website at http://greenbusinessca.org/alamedacounty.

 

 

Gold, Silver, and Bronze for San Francisco CalHeat

Submitted by Dorothea Peitz

 

From January 24 till January 26 the San Francisco CalHeat Team Handball Club hosted the 14th California Cup in Fremont. Some of the best men’s and women’s teams from across the US and Canada traveled all the way to the Bay Area to participate in this tournament. All teams showed high level handball and fair play during the whole weekend.

 

In the men’s competition the teams of San Francisco CalHeat 1 and Alberta THF took over the lead of their respective groups with clear victories from the beginning. After winning their semi-finals on Saturday evening the two teams competed for the gold trophy in a thrilling final on Sunday afternoon. Throughout the first half of the game CalHeat was ahead with two to four goals. Alberta kept fighting and tied the score a few times in the second half. However, the Most Valuable Goalkeeper of the men’s tournament, Lucas Kroger, showed an outstanding performance and played a major role in CalHeat’s final victory (21:18).

 

The men of San Francisco CalHeat 2 also made it to the semi-finals after some exciting and tight wins against Army West Point Black (26:24) and Air Force Team Handball (20:19) and one loss against Alberta THF (21:13). Their well-known team mates from CalHeat 1 were a tough opponent in the semi-finals but the team showed another very good performance in the fight for place 3. The game against Los Angeles Team Handball Club was even at the beginning but CalHeat 2 claimed the Bronze medal with a clear victory in the end (24:16).

 

The coach of both men’s teams, Danilo Rojevic, stated after the tournament, “This year’s CalCup was another great event for the books. We’ve managed to place our two teams in the top-3, the first time ever. Also, what an epic final against Alberta. The Canadians are slowly catching up with the best teams in the US and will surely claim the CalCup in the future. I’m proud of my players for winning it two years in a row.”

 

In the women’s competition of the CalCup tournament each of the five participating teams played against every other team once. The team from Alberta THF showed a superior performance. The Most Valuable Player and Top Scorer (27 goals) of the women’s tournament, Haven Wong, and her team won all games and got the well-deserved gold trophy. The second and third places were hard fought until the end. San Francisco CalHeat 1, Chicago Inter and Team Rogue won two games and lost two games in some very tight matches. Only the small head-to-head goal difference between these three teams decided the final placements: Silver for San Francisco CalHeat 1, Bronze for Chicago Inter, 4th place for Team Rogue and 5th place for San Francisco CalHeat 2.

 

The coach of both CalHeat’s women teams, Kristina Alavanja said, “We had tough competitors this year and the girls did an amazing job against the best teams in the country. They showed how much they improved as a team on and off the court. We have made a great progress and gained additional experiences through the games at CalCup.”

 

 

Textile submissions sought for gallery show

Submitted by Olive Hyde Art Gallery

 

Olive Hyde Art Gallery in Fremont is gearing up for its Annual Textile Exhibit, one of its most popular shows of the year. The first step is putting out the call for artists to submit their works to be a part of this year’s 52nd annual exhibition. Set for July 11 through August 22, the exhibition will feature works by traditional and contemporary artists who use textiles and fibers to create unique artwork and designs.

 

Submissions may include sculpture, weaving, quilt making, basket making, paper making, wearable art, bookmaking, and mixed media. All submissions should be made via email to olivehydecurator@fremont.gov. An opening reception to kick off the exhibition is set for 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, July 18 at the gallery, 123 Washington Blvd., Fremont. For gallery show information, call (510) 791-4357.

 

 

Get to Know Candidates Running for the Alameda County Supervisor Seat

Submitted by Setsuko Amann

 

The League of Women Voters of Fremont-Newark-Union City will hold a “Candidates Forum” for four hopefuls running for Alameda County Supervisor District 1. The Forum will take place Monday, February 10, 7 p.m. at Fremont City Hall.

 

The four candidates are vying to replace Tri-Valley Supervisor Scott Haggerty who is retiring after 24 years on the Board. They are: Fremont Councilman Vinnie Bacon, Dublin Mayor David Haubert, Dublin Councilwoman Melissa Hernandez and State Senator Bob Wieckowski.

 

The First Supervisorial District includes most of the city of Fremont, the cities of Dublin and Livermore, a portion of the unincorporated community of Sunol and most of the unincorporated area of the Livermore-Amador Valley. The election will take place March 3. Come hear how these candidates are positioning themselves for this hotly-contested seat.

 

 

Candidates Forum

Monday, Feb 10

7 p.m.

Fremont City Hall

3300 Capital Avenue

(510) 794-5783

voterservice@fnuc.org

 

 

Letter to the Editor

Personal census information is confidential

 

This letter is in response to an article [Jan 28, 2020_Privacy Fears Hinder 2020 Census Research] by Hugo Vera. Mr. Vera covered the basics of why census forms need to be filled out and returned but there were a few things missing in order to get everyone to realize the importance of who will benefit and why. The general population needs to know what is a census? How it works for everyone, and who will benefit, from citizens to city governments. Everyone should be told that, in all of this, the most important factor is that no personal information will be given to anyone at any time. If this is known, perhaps more people would fill out the forms as requested.

 

Grace England

Union City

 

 

Chinese New Year event cancelled

Submitted by Amy Cho

 

The annual Chinese New Year (CNY) celebration, scheduled for February 8, 2020, at the Fremont Library has been CANCELLED due to concerns over concerns of volunteers and parents from multiple performing groups about their children's health in a large gathering during the coronavirus emergency.

What You Need to Know About the Coronavirus

Submitted by Assemblymember Kansen Chu

 

The 2019 Novel Coronavirus (or more commonly known as Coronavirus) is a virus that has been identified as the cause of a respiratory illness outbreak. There is currently no vaccine to prevent Coronavirus infection. The best ways to protect yourself from the disease is to practice preventative actions, such as:

  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying home when you are sick.
  • Covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throwing the tissue in the trash immediately.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces.

 

Symptoms can include: fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Anyone who think they may have been exposed to the Coronavirus should contact your healthcare provider immediately.

Federal, state and local health authorities are closely watching the situation and how this virus spreads. If you need more information on or updates please visit the websites below:

 

https://www.cdc.gov/

https://www.sccgov.org/sites/phd/DiseaseInformation/novel-coronavirus/Pages/home.aspx

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories/china-travel-advisory.html

 

 

Update on Coronavirus

Submitted by Supervisor Dave Cortese

 

Santa Clara County’s Public Health Officer, Dr. Sarah Cody, announced on Friday, January 31, that the Centers for Disease Control has confirmed one case of the coronavirus in Santa Clara County, but that the patient is isolated and there is no evidence of the virus circulating in the Bay Area. The risk to the public of contracting the illness in Santa Clara County is very low.

 

The patient, an adult male who returned from China on January 24, is self-isolated at his home. He was never ill enough to be hospitalized and left home only for outpatient care. Dr. Cody and the Public Health Department are working to identify anyone that the man might have been in contact with and are following up with them.

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is keeping track of the coronavirus outbreak worldwide, and travelers from Wuhan are being screened at five major airports in the United States, including the San Francisco International Airport. Locally, the Santa Clara County is closely monitoring the spread of the illness and has activated the Public Health Emergency Operations Center in case there is a need to respond to future cases of the virus in our area.

 

The county is also making sure that it is monitoring and sending information out to vulnerable communities, including inmates in the county jail system, as well as the unhoused population. The county will also focus attention on monitoring and getting information to community and senior centers, especially in Asian immigrant communities, where there may be more people who travel to and from China and other parts of Asia.

 

The County Public Health Department has also dedicated a Public Health webpage, https://www.sccgov.org/sites/phd/DiseaseInformation/novel-coronavirus/Pages/home.aspx, to keep the community informed with daily updates, along with providing a FAQ in four languages. The page also provides in-depth information about symptoms, travel recommendations and how to protect your family.

 

If you have questions, call the Public Health Department at (408) 885-4214 or Dave Cortese’s office at (408) 299-5030.

 

 

Cougars Report

Submitted by Timothy Hess

 

Boys Soccer

The Newark Memorial High School Boys Soccer Team beat Mission San Jose (Fremont) by the score of 4-0 on January 31st in Mission Valley Athletic League action.

 

On February 1st, the Cougars won at Granada (Livermore), defeating the Matadors 4-0 in an non-league contest.

 

GO COUGARS!

 

 

Earthquake walk reveals area’s shaky history

By Rob Klindt

 

From the gently rolling foothills to the east; myriad slopes, knolls, ridges; and pockets of water forming lagoons, creeks and lakes throughout the region, the topography in the Tri-City area is undeniably scenic. But how did it evolve?

 

Most longtime residents know that the East Bay hills follow the Hayward earthquake fault, which is a part of the massive San Andreas fault system. Fault movements and earthquakes over millions of years gently – and sometimes not so gently – pushed, rolled and lifted the ground to form the hills. But that’s not all: seismic creeping also created smaller knolls and land depressions where seasonal and permanent ponds and streams have formed.

 

In Fremont, evidence of seismic creep can be seen in many urban areas in the form of offset curbs, cracked concrete and knolls created by land compression. This seismic activity isn’t just in the geologic past; it’s continuing today.

 

With that in mind, the Math Science Nucleus (MSN) is offering four “Living in Earthquake Country” walking tours where participants will see direct evidence of ongoing seismic activities in Fremont. The tours are aimed at children and families and focus on removing fear about earthquakes through education and preparation. Founded in 1982, MSN is a Fremont-based non-profit organization focusing on K-8 science and math education. It also manages the Children’s Natural History Museum and Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon Wetland Center in Fremont.

 

“We want people to be aware that faults are found throughout the Bay Area, and understanding how they work prevents fear,” said Joyce Blueford, Ph.D., MSN Board President. During the 90-minute walking tours, participants will learn about the power of earthquakes, and discuss various earthquake faults in the Bay Area and how to react when an earthquake occurs.

 

The upcoming earthquake walking tours, led by MSN instructors, are set for 10:00 a.m. on Saturdays: February 29, March 14, April 25 and May 9. Participants will meet behind the Fremont Community Center facing Lake Elizabeth in Central Park on Paseo Padre Parkway.

 

“This is a new tour to include little ones,” explained Blueford. “It will include a shaker table and other age-appropriate demonstrations.” One of the biggest surprises on the tour is a look at a large crack across a conference room floor inside the Community Center that offers dramatic evidence of fault activity. “Most people that come into the room think the crack is fake,” Blueford said. “And it takes several times talking about it before they realize it’s the real thing.”

 

Rounding out the program is a 1.5 mile walk through Central Park to see signs of seismic activity including offset curbs, cracked and buckled concrete and ascending knolls. Tours are aimed at children 5 and older and adults. The cost is $15 per person, or $12 for MSN members, and includes a “Faults of The Bay Area” T-shirt while supplies last. Sign-ups can be made on the MSN website at http://msnucleus.org/haywardfault/classes.html.

 

Meanwhile, for teenagers and adults who want to know a bit more about earthquakes, the City of Fremont in partnership with MSN is offering a similar, but more in-depth “Earthquake Walk at Central Park” program on Saturday, March 21. Participants will learn what scientists mean when they describe the 45-mile-long Hayward fault as a right-lateral strike-slip fault, and how it and other regional faults move.

 

The 90-minute tour starts at 9:30 a.m. behind the Fremont Community Center. The cost is $15 for Fremont residents, $20 for non-residents. Advance registrations can be made online by visiting www.regerec.com, then clicking on the “Activities” link, entering barcode 278320 in the search box and following the prompts.

 

Finally, for those who prefer an independent, self-paced tour, a series of informational Earthquake Exhibit signs guide visitors along the same Central Park route. The first sign is behind the Fremont Community Center. It’s free and open every day during park hours.

 

Living in Earthquake Country

Saturdays, Feb 29, Mar 14, Apr 25, May 9

10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Earthquake Exhibit/Fremont Community Center

40204 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont

(510) 790-6284

http://msnucleus.org/haywardfault/classes.html

$15 per person, $12 for MSN members

 

Earthquake Walk at Central Park

Saturday, Mar 21

9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Earthquake Exhibit/Fremont Community Center

40204 Paseo Padre Pkwy, Fremont

(510) 494-4300

Register online at www.regerec.com, then click on “Activities”

Enter barcode 278230 in search box and follow prompts

$15 Fremont residents; $20 non-residents

 

 

Park It

By Ned MacKay

 

Although we usually think of springtime as the flower season, there are winter blooms as well. There’s an opportunity to see some of the first wildflowers on a free hike from 10 a.m. to 12 noon Sunday, February 9, at Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch. This is a steep and rocky climb on the park’s Chaparral Loop Trail, for ages 8 and older.

 

Meet at the end of Somersville Road, 3½ miles south of Highway 4. Black Diamond Mines has a parking fee of $5 per vehicle when the kiosk is staffed. For information, call (888) 327-2757, ext. 2750.

 

A king tide, one of the highest of the year, will occur on Saturday, February 8. You can see the effects on wetlands and learn what causes king tides during a program from 1:30 to 3:00 p.m. February 8 at Big Break Regional Shoreline in Oakley.

 

Big Break is at 69 Big Break Road, off Oakley’s Main Street. Call (888) 327-2757, ext. 3050 for information.

 

Saturday and Sunday Strolls are a series of family friendly, naturalist-led, 3- to 4-mile hikes at various regional parks and trails. Dogs on leash are welcome. A Sunday Stroll from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on February 9 will take place on the Lafayette-Moraga Regional Trail. It’s a 3¾ mile round trip to view a waterfall and look for wildlife. Bathrooms are available at the halfway point.

 

Meet at the St. Mary’s Road staging area in Moraga. For information, call (510) 544-3187.

 

Gardening, creeks and ponds, and cider are all on the weekend agenda at the Tilden Nature Area near Berkeley. From 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, February 8, interpretive student aide Em Ritchie will show how to design and build a garden landscape, while working in the Environmental Education Center’s Kids’ Garden.

 

Naturalist Trent Pearce will lead a creek and pond survey from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, February 8 and February 22. You can use dip nets to help Pearce document the waterbug population. Wear shoes that can get wet and muddy. The program will take place rain or shine.

 

If cider is to your taste, join naturalist Jenna Collins from 12 noon to 1 p.m. Sundays, February 9 and February 23, at the center to learn how fresh apples are pressed into hot cider.

 

Collins will also lead “chores for little gardeners” from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays, February 9 and February 23, at the Kids’ Garden. Everyone can lend a hand weeding, watering and planting vegetables, maybe tasting a few.

 

The center and garden are at the north end of Tilden’s Central Park Drive. For information, call (510) 544-2233.

 

Early risers will enjoy a hike from 6:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. Saturday, February 8, at Coyote Hills Regional Park in Fremont. Naturalist Kristina Parkison will lead the walk to see the sunrise and watch the wildlife shift change as some animals end their day and others begin it. The hike is for ages 12 and older, and registration is required. To register, call (888) 327-2757; select option 2 and refer to program number 27778.

 

Coyote Hills is at the end of Patterson Ranch Road. For information, call (510) 544-3220.

 

Bird watching and nature games are on the calendar at Del Valle Regional Park south of Livermore. The birding is from 10 a.m. to 12 noon Saturday, February 8, a search for water-loving visitors. Meet at the visitor center. Naturalist Ashley Grenier will lead a session of nature games and wildlife exploration, rain or shine. Drop by any time between 10 a.m. and 12 noon Sunday, February 9, at the Fiesta Grande picnic area to join in the fun.

 

Del Valle is at the end of Del Valle Road, off Mines Road about 9 miles south of Livermore. For information, call (510) 544-3146 or email dvvisit@ebparks.org.

 

There are always family friendly activities to enjoy in the regional parks. For information, visit www.ebparks.org.

 

 

Editorial

What id happening?

 

Sigmund Freud postulated that personality is based on three important factors. In his personality theory of the early 20th century, he explained that behavioral components of an individual – id, ego, superego – are involved in how a person responds to internal and external urges, needs and desires.

 

He labeled basic primitive and inherited drives as the “id” which are impulsive and often unconscious behaviors. Immediate gratification is a primary motivation. A child’s temper tantrum is a display of the power of the id.

 

As we mature, personality is shaped by development of a set of controls that Freud termed “ego” and “superego.” Ego guides a person to interact rationally with society and direct strong id emotions and impulses. Bowing to social mores, it directs wants and needs toward actions that will be acceptable to others. While ego acts as a monitor, superego integrates morality into the mix and strives for recognition, reward and idealistic behavior.

 

Watching the shenanigans of the political world, sometimes it is hard to understand why, in mature adults, the id dominates ego and overwhelms superego, especially in the midst of election campaigns. Our communities have, for the most part, resisted the crass and unscrupulous behavior that has marked some locales but on the scale of growth and progress, the less attractive effects of congestion and financial temptations arise and id can reign supreme.

 

The southeast bay area is experiencing the stress and strain of our transformation from rural/suburban to suburban/urban. And with this change, comes the question of how our political landscape and personal perspectives are affected by the conversion. Not only has the political landscape changed to include the woes and missteps of large cities and corrosive behavior, but within this environment, a selfish id can reign supreme.

 

National discourse has degenerated and with it, societal norms have been discarded in favor of a rampant id that suppresses ego and neglects superego. Future generations are watching and responding to this behavior.

 

Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 adaptation of Anthony Burgess’s novel “A Clockwork Orange” posed the conundrum of a society that devolved into a violent, dystopian future attempting to solve unfettered ids with psychological and mechanical conditioning… it didn’t’ work. A human covering over mechanized controls cannot substitute for harmony of id, ego and superego. Using Freud’s concepts, the answer lies in strong reward system of societal acceptance. The ultimate measure of this control lies at the ballot box. The experiment of a democratic republic is under duress; it will wither if citizens shirk their responsibility at the ballot box with a laissez-faire attitude toward adequate vetting of candidates.

 

One month from now, every citizen in our communities will have a chance to demonstrate either the triumph or failure of peaceful coexistence of id, ego and superego. Will id dominate?

 

 

Bay Area’s green ramen

By Stephanie Gertsch

 

Across the street from Hayward’s Chabot College, you will find Eon Coffee, a study spot with a reputation for healthy organic snacks, coffee made from in-house roasted Arabic beans, and their signature mulberry tea. But on Saturday and Sunday mornings, red flags spring up along the street, signaling the arrival of the café’s weekend lunch specialty: ramen. Once you order a bowl of miso, shio, or shouyu, you will notice something else. The smooth, chewy noodles are actually light green with tiny specks of the vegetable moroheiya. Eon Coffee is probably the only place in the Bay Area to serve ramen with vegetable-based noodles, but at the same time this is also one of the area’s most authentic Japanese dining experiences.

 

Eon Coffee prides itself on serving reliably sourced organic foods, such as mulberry tea, which is popular because it’s tasty but also contains no caffeine and naturally regulates cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar. However, the shop is always looking for new products. At a natural food fair in Los Angeles, Eon representatives met organic farmer Sho Oga, a native from Japan who was innovating clean farming methods in Thailand. At the time, Eon was primarily interested in mulberry tea, but they became fascinated by Oga’s instant moroheiya-based ramen. The dish was already popular in Thailand, but could vegetable ramen work in America?

 

Morio Tateno came on as ramen chef with the goal of designing a complete entrée based on Sho Oga’s moroheiya noodles. Raised in a small town near Tokyo, he traces his experience with noodles back to childhood. “My passion for noodles started with the culture of my household where my grandma many times made handmade soba (buckwheat) noodles,” Tateno says. “I grew up with them.” He had no experience with ramen, but was intrigued and decided to try. Especially, he wanted to create an alternative to the shortcuts he saw being used in Bay Area ramen shops: “We didn’t want to use anyone else’s frozen noodles and we didn’t want to use a pre-made soup base.”

 

After training in the Kagawa prefecture Japan, Tateno began to experimenting to find the right blend of flour, moroheiya, and seasoning to make the perfect noodles for Eon. Six months later the ramen debuted in Summer of 2014. Every Friday, Tateno makes the noodles from scratch, mixing and kneading the dough, and running it through the noodle machine until it’s light and fluffy. Noodles are wrapped in plastic to keep them from drying out overnight, and each week, customers eat noodles that have been made on the premises only 48 hours ago.

 

Crafting the ramen is a weeklong process, and at each step Tateno takes care to use all organic ingredients and cut down on fat and oil. “Broth is very simple, although its time consuming and labor intensive,” says Tateno. His broth simmers for two days, flavored with chicken and pork bones. As fat rises to the top, Tateno skims it off just as quickly—a step many shops skip. To recreate the texture of fat, Tateno adds an unusual ingredient: chicken feet. These plump little appendages pack in collagen, giving the broth its smooth texture. In his words, “That’s the magic of chicken feet.” Tateno also adds small amounts of flavored oil to give each broth: sesame based oil for Miso, ginger based oil for Shouyu, and a touch of fat from the chashuu (pork topping) for Shio.

 

However, designing a product is only the first step. “The first hurdle of any entrepreneur is everyone wants to serve good quality food for a reasonable price,” Tateno says. “That’s a given. Then what’s next? Cost. How can I manage the cost so there is a decent amount of profit?” Luckily, Eon has an advantage by being a coffee shop first and a ramen spot second. This means even if ramen doesn’t turn a profit, the shop can still rely on their other products. Tateno says, “On that particular day Eon ramen may be dragging Eon’s business down, but the next day many ramen customers may come and buy coffee and other things, so ramen is helping Eon.”

 

According to Tateno, Hayward tends to be a more conservative area for restaurants compared to Oakland, Milpitas and Berkeley. However, the shop does have a regular influx of students and professors from Chabot College looking for a drink or quick lunch between classes. Another local middle school teacher comes in two or three times a day. Still, these are Eon regulars, not ramen regulars. Tateno says, “Monday through Friday no one knows anything about ramen.” You won’t see anything about ramen on Eon’s website, so unless you happen to come around lunchtime on a weekend, you might not even know it’s available. Tateno stays in the kitchen, but each week he asks servers the same question: “‘What kind of customers did you see today?’ And the answer is ‘A few new customers and a lot of regular customers.’ Among these, one family even comes from San Francisco, almost two times a month.” People don’t seek out Eon Coffee for the ramen, but those who try it once usually end up coming back.

 

What’s the future of Eon ramen? Tateno would like to keep the classic dishes, but introduce variations such as hiyashi ramen during the hot summer months. This dish is more like a noodle salad with tomato and cucumber. Tateno says, “That’s what quite a few Japanese people eat in the summertime; sometimes you see ice cubes on it.” Tateno may even go back to his roots and introduce his childhood favorite of soba. These noodles are buckwheat, with a broth from bonito (fish) flakes, shiitake mushrooms, konbu (kelp), and soy sauce. The dish has less gluten and no pork, which makes it a healthy dish that Muslim residents can also enjoy.

 

In the meantime, the regular dishes are going strong: miso is served weekly, while shio and shouyu alternate. Recently, Tateno has added a hint of bonito flakes to his Miso Special, to call back to the simple miso soup he and many other Japanese people ate daily growing up. So, whether you are a health fan or a foodie, why not stop by Eon Coffee to say Itadakimasu?

 

Eon Coffee ramen lunch

Saturdays – Sundays

11: 30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Eon Coffee

24970 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward

(510) 264-0507

http://www.eoncoffee.com/

Standard dish: $9.88

 

 

Union City Launches Five-Year Strategic Plan

Submitted by City of Union City

 

The City of Union City is starting the year off with a Strategic Plan, which sets city goals through the year 2025. The Strategic Plan contains a renewed mission and vision for the City, along with five multi-year goals that will guide decision-making and resources for the next five years.

 

The five multi-year goals cover the areas of (A) Financial Stability and Sustainability, (B) Governance and Organization Effectiveness, (C) Economic, Community Development and Public Safety, (D) Environmental Sustainability and Infrastructure, and (E) Communication and Outreach.

 

Of top priority, the City Council identified nine strategies for the 2020—2022 fiscal years, which include:

 

  • Establish a comprehensive fiscal stability and sustainability plan to address the General Fund’s long-term deficit.
  • Determine the level of reauthorization of the public safety parcel tax and develop an informational plan.
  • Reduce costs associated with the City’s fire contract with Alameda County.
  • Align the provision of critical city services and Strategic Plan implementation with current staffing levels.
  • Establish professional development plans for each employee to optimize staff resources, support their growth and demonstrate commitment to employees’ careers through a mentoring program and cross-training assignments.
  • Analyze the feasibility of transforming warehouses to attract high-value industrial and commercial uses for the benefit of the community.
  • Facilitate the build out of the greater Station District Area through construction of Quarry Lakes Parkway, upgrades to the BART Station, completion of pedestrian rail crossing and sale and development of city-owned land.
  • Develop a multi-departmental approach to address homelessness through coordination with staff, community organizations and Alameda County.
  • Conduct outreach and community education about City services, financial resources, areas of cost, and impacts of failed ballot measures.

 

Many of these strategies are well underway, including reductions in costs associated with the City’s fire contract with Alameda County by way of closing an underutilized fire station and the placement of Measure U, the City’s public safety parcel tax, on the March 3, 2020 Primary Election ballot. If approved by voters, Measure U would renew public safety funding that has been in place for 16 years.

 

Mayor Carol Dutra-Vernaci expresses, “To earn and keep the public’s trust, we have created a Strategic Plan, which was thoughtfully developed with input from the community and employees. I am confident that the City Council and I have built a plan that will improve our financial health and make our community more sustainable in the future. With a strong commitment to making data-driven decisions, we will be able to more effectively allocate our limited resources in the right areas.”

 

Read the full Strategic Plan at www.unioncity.org/goals.

 

 

Fremont Police Log

Submitted by Geneva Bosques, Fremont PD

 

Saturday, January 25

  • During the early afternoon officers responded to reports of up to 50 juveniles on bicycles blocking traffic in the central and downtown area. When officers tried to contact the group, the bicyclists fled in different directions with one of them throwing objects at officers. Eventually, officers stopped a large group of them near Mowry Avenue and Cherry Street and the youth who threw objects at officers was detained. Meanwhile, another youth was involved in an altercation in the parking lot at Whole Foods while another one cursed at a police sergeant nearby. Both were detained by police.

 

The group was determined to be from the Hayward/San Leandro area. Officers cited at least 12 of the bicyclists, ages 13 to 16, for blocking the roadway and helmet violations. Two of them were arrested for resisting or obstructing an officer and taken to the police station and issued a notice to appear court order and released to their parents/guardians. Police are taking a proactive stance against this type of behavior and are asking community members who see this activity to call them at (510) 790-6800, extension 3.

 

 

Three siblings nabbed in shoplifting ring

Submitted by Hayward PD

 

Not one, not two, but three grinches were captured just before Christmas, according to a statement issued January 28 by the Hayward Police Department (HPD). The three female suspects – all sisters — were arrested December 18 following a months-long investigation into an organized retail theft ring in the East Bay.

 

The investigation started early last summer when several retailers at Southland Mall asked HPD for help in curtailing a growing number of grab-and-run thefts. The suspects were also reportedly assaulting the retailers during the incidents.

 

HPD robbery detectives were also assigned to investigate retail thefts occurring in Hayward and nearby communities. In July, HPD detectives identified an organized retail theft ring that led to a well-established fencing operation being run in Oakland. Three women, later identified by police as siblings Jessica Rodriguez, 27, Jessenia Rodriguez, 24 and Norma Rodriguez, 33, were identified as the suspects. They were using two homes in Oakland as their base of operations. Both locations were utilized to store, advertise and sell the stolen items.

 

The locations had an outdoor store built in the backyard, complete with shelving and clothing racks. Surveillance revealed entire families purchasing stolen merchandise. The stolen property was sold at a huge discount. Property was also sold out of the homes and on Facebook Marketplace.

 

The sisters were recruiting groups of thieves and requesting specific merchandise to be stolen. The suspects would steal merchandise in Hayward and throughout the Bay Area. After stealing merchandise, the suspects would arrive at one of the residences and exchange the items for cash. A typical theft could yield stolen merchandise valued anywhere from $5,000 to $10,000. The thieves would then receive money from the suspects.

 

HPD was assisted in the investigation by The Oakland and San Jose Police Departments. The sisters were taken into custody on December 18 when HPD officers conducted an arrest and search warrant operation at both Oakland locations. The homes were searched and the items were collected. Retail representatives from 18 different stores came and identified items and recovered what belonged to their stores. More than $300,000 in merchandise was recovered. The three suspects were arrested and booked at Hayward Police Jail.

 

On January 15 each sister was charged with various felonies by the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office including organizing and directing retail theft and receiving stolen property. All three suspects were arraigned on Friday, January 24.

Unwanted guns? Dispose of them safely

Submitted by Milpitas PD

 

Turn in your guns and get cash, no questions asked. That’s the idea behind an anonymous gun buyback program the Milpitas Police Department is participating in along with numerous other South Bay agencies.

 

The goal of the event is to reduce the availability of unwanted, unsafe, and illegal guns in local communities by providing people with an opportunity to safely and anonymously dispose of firearms. The four-hour event starts at 8 a.m. Saturday, February 29 in the parking lot of Sunnyvale Presbyterian Church on Fremont Avenue.

 

Participating agencies, elected officials, and the Sunnyvale City Council have provided the funding necessary to pay participants for their firearms. Each participant will receive $100 per handgun and $200 per assault rifle to the maximum of $400. There will be no limit to the number of guns an individual may surrender for safe disposal. An important reminder for the day of the event: all guns must be unloaded and stored in the trunk of participants’ car. Buybacks will be first-come, first-serve.

 

Other agencies participating in the program include the Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety, Mountain View Police, Los Altos Police, Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Office, Santa Clara Police, Palo Alto Police and Campbell Police.

 

For more information about the event call Captain Craig Anderson at (650) 382-2603.

 

Anonymous Gun Buyback

Saturday, Feb 29

8 a.m. – 12 noon

Sunnyvale Presbyterian Church (parking lot)

728 W. Fremont Ave., Sunnyvale

(650) 382-2603

Free

 

 

Get ready for hoopster tricks and tips

Submitted by New Haven Unified School District

 

The Harlem Wizards basketball team will be bringing their well-known tricks and alley oops with them when they take on the Union City All Stars in an upcoming game to benefit local schools. Leading the All Stars will be Union City Mayor Carol Dutra-Vernaci and New Haven Unified School District Superintendent Dr. John Thompson. Rounding out the All Stars team will be various teachers, community leaders and residents.

 

The fun starts at 7 p.m. Friday, February 7 at the James Logan High School Pavilion on H St. Doors open at 6 p.m. Advance tickets at $12 to $40 are available online with a $1.25 processing fee at https://harlemwizards.thundertix.com/events/162243. Tickets at the door are $15 to $40 as seats are available. Students in kindergarten through 9th grade must be accompanied by an adult. For details, call (510) 471-1100.

 

Harlem Wizards

Friday, Feb 7

7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.)

Fundraising basketball game

Logan High School Pavilion

1800 H St., Union City

(510) 471-1100.

Tickets online: $12-$40

https://harlemwizards.thundertix.com/events/162243

 

 

Art Exhibits at the Hayward Public Library

Submitted by Winda Shimizu

 

Hayward Arts Council, in collaboration with Hayward Public Library, is presenting the exhibit “New Members and Emerging Artists” on the second floor of the Hayward 21st Century Library and Learning Center in downtown Hayward until March 14. Join us at the artists’ reception on Saturday, February 8.

 

New members Kristia Bondoc, Kimberly DeLand, Natalie Juntz, Claudine Krause, Maria Ochoa, Danika Philis, Chelsea Tikotsky, and Wenonah Washington are showing a variety of media including acrylics, pastels, photography, mixed media, recycled materials, digital print, paper art, and ink.

 

New Members and Emerging Artists is the second exhibit hosted by the Hayward Library. Gallery hours are Monday – Wednesday: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., Thursday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (Closed Sundays).

 

In addition, the Hayward Public Library is presenting the “Six by Two Exhibit,” comprised of 12 art pieces from six Hayward Arts Council members in the exhibition hall near the staircase. Artists are Richard Geiger (watercolor), Kimberly Ladewig (wool and watercolor), Kate Hardwig (watercolor), Gerald Thompson (oil), and Patra Nesseth-Steffes (digital photography) and Loretta Siegel (acrylic).

 

New Members and Emerging Artists and Six by Two are sponsored by Hayward Arts Council (HAC), which stimulates interest in visual and performing arts, promotes opportunities for artists to exhibit, and encourages public participation in free art demonstrations and events. Visit www.haywardartscouncil.org for more gallery exhibits and events.

 

New Members and Emerging Artists

Monday, Jan 20 – Saturday, Mar 14

Mon – Wed: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Thurs – Sat: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

 

Artists’ Reception

Saturday, Feb 8; 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

 

Hayward 21st Century Library

888 C St., Hayward

(510) 538-2787

www.haywardartscouncil.org

 

 

Come find true fur love

Submitted by Lyanne Mendez

 

Assemblymember Bill Quirk (D-Hayward) and Hayward Animal Shelter will be hosting the All Fur Love Pet Adoption Day on Saturday, February 8. Help our furry friends find forever homes and learn how to adopt a pet, proper pet care, animal safety laws, and updates on current legislation protecting pets.

 

Free and reduced-cost pet adoptions will be offered to qualified homes. The shelter will also be taking donations for those who already have furry companions and would like to take a photo at the Valentine’s Day themed photo booth.

 

To adopt you need to meet the following requirements:

  • All members of the household must be present (including other dogs if you are interested in a dog)
  • A current photo identification card
  • Proof of address (if identification card doesn’t have address)
  • If you are a renter, you must provide landlord or property manager’s contact information as they will be contacted before any adoption is finalized

 

For more information, contact Assemblymember Quirk’s office at (510) 583-8818 or email Lyanne.Mendez@asm.ca.gov.

 

All Fur Love Pet Adoption Day

Saturday, Feb 8

11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Hayward Animal Shelter

16 Barnes Ct., Hayward

(510) 583-8818

Lyanne.Mendez@asm.ca.gov

 

 

National Fitness Campaign Courts Opening

Submitted by Jacqui Diaz

 

The Hayward Area Recreation and Park District (H.A.R.D.) announces the grand opening of three National Fitness Campaign (NFC) Fitness Courts® in the district. A grand opening celebration will be held on Saturday, February 8. The grand opening will have a ribbon cutting ceremony and fitness ambassadors and trainers on site to explain the many options. Residents can take free classes and get the most out of their workout with the official National Fitness Campaign App, which is available to download at Apple and Google Play.

 

The Fitness Courts® are free to use and available to the community with the goal of both encouraging and simplifying access to healthy lifestyles. The outdoor gyms provide a full-body functional fitness workout for adults of all ability levels. With over 30 pieces of bodyweight equipment, the courts can be used in thousands of ways. The courts are ideal for everyone from beginning to elite level athletes – there’s no wrong way to use them.

 

H.A.R.D. received a grant from the National Fitness Campaign to provide three sites for free fitness opportunities for the community. The three NFC sites in Hayward are Eden Greenway at Cypress Street and Harder Road, Tennyson Park at Panjon Street and Huntwood Road, and Alden E. Oliver Sports Park at 2580 Eden Park Place. To learn more about H.A.R.D. programs and events, visit www.HaywardRec.org or call (510) 881-6700.

 

Grand Opening Celebration

Saturday, Feb 8

10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Alden E. Oliver Sports Park

2580 Eden Park Pl., Hayward

(510) 881-6700

www.HaywardRec.org

 

 

Hayward Chamber of Commerce award gala

Submitted by Kim Huggett

 

Paul and Pat Hodges of Hodges Realty have been named the 30th Hayward Chamber of Commerce Business Persons of the Year. They’ll be honored at the 76th annual chamber awards banquet February 8 at Cal State East Bay, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Also honored will be Lisa Tess, principal of Winton Middle School, as Educator of the Year; Capt. Jeff Dimick as Firefighter of the Year; and Erik Dadej as Police Officer of the Year. All will be honored at the chamber’s 2020 gala.

 

The event will feature a reception followed by a gourmet meal, fine wines, and the awards ceremony. Silent and live auctions will benefit Leadership Hayward, now in its 30th year of training Hayward’s current and future leaders. Auction items will include a mini-tournament at TPC Stonebrae Country Club and four-packs of tickets for opening day and opening night at the Oakland Athletics.

 

RSVPs and payments for tickets, at $175 apiece, can now be made atwww.hayward.org. Tables of eight can be reserved for $1,600 and event sponsorships can be arranged with Kim Huggett at the chamber office, 510-537-2424, kimh@Hayward.org. No tickets will be sold at the door.

 

Business Persons of the Year

Paul and Pat Hodges

 

Hodges Realty

Sponsored by Kaiser Permanente

 

Paul and Pat Hodges established their business in Hayward 37 years ago and that began a legacy of professionalism and volunteerism that has seen them recognized among Hayward’s most outstanding citizens. Their service to the business community includes participation on the Hayward Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors Committee and working at events such as the downtown street parties.

 

The husband and wife team are graduates of Hayward high schools and California State University, East Bay / Hayward. Their volunteerism includes coaching, teaching, service on boards, and working in support of bonds and legislation in support of schools, parks and their profession. They both have served in the Hayward Education Foundation, and each has been honored with that organization’s volunteer of the year award.

 

Paul serves on the board of directors of the Hayward Area Recreation and Park District and Pat is on the Hayward Unified School District Personnel Commission and the Hayward Area Historical Society Board of Directors.

 

Educator of the Year

Lisa Tess

Winton Middle School

Sponsored by Tri-CED Recycling

 

Lisa Tess has been an educator in the Hayward Unified School District for more than 24 years. She began her career as a history teacher and then became an administrator applying her experience with students to a world outside the classroom.

 

For three years, Lisa was a Title I grant coordinator for the Alameda County Office of Education, on loan from the HUSD. She returned to Winton Middle School and became the assistant principal and later principal. As principal, she has created a community school approach. She has been the HUSD president for the Association of California School Administrators for the past six years.

 

Firefighter of the Year

Capt. Jeff Dimick

Sponsored by Falck Ambulance

 

Hayward Fire Captain Jeff Dimick has been a loyal member of the department since 2007. He has been secretary for the Hayward Firefighters Local 1909 for over five years. He plays an integral role as a member of the executive board with his leadership, intelligence, humility, savviness and dependability.

 

In addition to his union involvement, Jeff has been a member of the Hayward Fire Recruit Academy Cadre for numerous academies during his tenure. He also has assisted in teaching Hayward youth that are aspiring firefighters in the ROP program. He has been instrumental in taking the lead with various charitable events in the Hayward community, including the Steve Holt Memorial Charity Softball Tournament, Hayward Fire Charity Stickball and the annual Red Dress Event.

 

Jeff also volunteers in his own Pleasant Hill community by coaching Little League teams and supporting other events with his family. His contributions to the HFD, Local 1909, City of Hayward, and City of Pleasant Hill.

 

Police Officer of the Year

Erik Dadej

Sponsored by St. Rose Hospital

 

Officer Dadej has been with the Hayward Police Department for more than five years and is a member of the HPD Patrol Wellness Group, Peer Support, an instructor for the Emergency Vehicle Operator Course and Major Accident Investigation Team, and a field training officer.

 

He has been recognized by the Criminal Investigations Bureau for his persistence and inventiveness in solving crimes such as the theft of vehicles and expensive construction equipment. His volunteerism includes working at his son’s elementary school.

 

He plays hockey with a team of police officers and firefighters that includes in its schedule games for charitable organizations such as the Nayeli Faith Foundation, which gives support to families dealing with congenital diaphragmatic hernias. The team also competes at the annual Police vs. Fire Olympic Games.

 

 

Board OKs Homeless Task Force and Action Plan

Submitted by Janice Rombeck

 

In an urgent response to the immediate needs of thousands of residents living outdoors and in their cars, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved a slate of community-generated initiatives that include creating a Homeless Task Force that will focus on short-term solutions to provide shelter and services.

 

The board voted unanimously on January 28 to approve Supervisor Dave Cortese’s plan to create the Task Force and move forward with other initiatives that came out of a daylong Community Summit on Homelessness that drew 240 participants, including 60 who were currently homeless.

 

“Focusing on transitional housing and temporary shelter is long overdue,” said Cortese. “Today, we have called for administration to return to the Board with strategies to turn these ideas, many of which came directly from Summit discussions, into action.”

 

Besides the Task Force, recommendations in the report on the Summit on Homelessness include:

  • Create communities with granny units or tiny homes with on-site services
  • Expand the County’s Behavioral Health Services’ Mobile Crisis Response Team
  • Provide containers and lockers for unhoused individuals to keep their belonging safe during the day
  • Fund more portable showers and toilets, laundry services and trash cans.
  • Increase funding for more mental health workers and drug and alcohol addiction counselors
  • Look at increasing homeless prevention resources

 

Cortese is also calling for the county to:

  • Develop a plan to increase 2,000 shelter beds in the next 12 to 18 months countywide with at least 200 beds per Supervisorial District
  • Explore how Governor Newsom’s executive order on state investments in homelessness can be used in the county, including surplus state land and state-owned trailers and tents
  • Propose options for the county to add staff to the Office of Supportive Housing dedicated to transitional housing
  • Examine current shelters and how they operate and how the county’s senior residents are uniquely and disproportionately impacted by the homelessness crisis

 

For more information, contact the Office of Supervisor Dave Cortese at (408) 299-5030.

 

 

Honor Roll

 

McKendree University, Illinois

Fall 2019 Dean’s List

  • Eli Denmead of Fremont

 

Hofstra University, New York

Fall 2019 Dean’s List

  • Trinity Copeland of Fremont

 

Champlain College, Vermont

Fall 2019 Dean’s List

  • Caitlyn Dangvu of Milpitas

 

Shenandoah University, Virginia

Fall 2019 President’s List

  • Linh Quan of Milpitas

 

Knox College, Illinois

Fall 2019 Dean’s List

  • Thao Luong of Fremont
  • Tanay Singh of Fremont

 

Georgia Institute of Technology

Fall 2019 graduates

  • Jieming Fu of Fremont
  • Xiaohui Han of Milpitas
  • Yunzhe Huang of Fremont
  • Adam May of Milpitas
  • Areeb Mehmood of Fremont
  • Shyam Rai of Milpitas
  • Zhenning Tan of Union City
  • Jason Tiller of Fremont
  • Lifeng Wan of Union City
  • Feng Yang of Fremont

 

Palmer College of Chiropractic, Iowa

Fall 2019 Dean’s List

  • George Ceja of Milpitas
  • Parker Forbes of Fremont
  • Zachary Fulks, of Milpitas
  • Korina Gov, of Milpitas
  • Simon McFarlane, of Milpitas
  • Domingo Silva, of Milpitas
  • Janelle Slugoski, of Milpitas
  • Bryar Starr of Milpitas
  • Isaac Williams, of Milpitas

 

 

CONTINUING EVENTS:

Saturdays – Sundays, Jan 4 – Feb 29

Wild Wonders

2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Games, activities, crafts for all ages

Sunol Regional Wilderness

1895 Geary Rd., Sunol

(510) 544-3249

www.ebparks.org

 

Thursday – Sunday, Jan 7 – Mar 31

Animal Feeding $

3 p.m.

Check for eggs, feed animals hay. Meet at Chicken Coop

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Thursday – Sunday, Jan 11 – Feb 8

Symphony of Color – Abstract 7

12 noon – 5 p.m.

Abstract art exhibit

Olive Hyde Art Gallery

123 Washington Blvd., Fremont

(510) 791-4357

www.olivehydeartguild.org

 

Mondays, Jan 13 – Mar 30

Job Lab

12:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

One-on-one help for job seekers

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

www.aclibrary.org

 

Monday – Friday, Jan 17 – Mar 6

Celebrate Women

9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Collaboration of artists, musicians and writers.

John O’Lague Galleria

777 B St., Hayward

(510) 538-2787

www.haywardartscouncil.org

www.nlapw.org

 

Friday, Jan 24 – Monday, Mar 16

31st Children’s Book Illustrator show

Fri – Sun: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Exhibit of children’s book illustrations

Sun Gallery

1015 E. St., Hayward

(510) 581-4050

http://sungallery.org/

 

Saturday – Thursday, Jan 28 – Apr 7

Explosions of Color

During library hours

Display of 12 paintings by Winnie Thompson

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

www.aclibrary.org

 

Monday – Sunday, Jan 31 – Feb 28

Variety is the Spice of Life

During business hours

Art pieces by Jaci Daskarolis

Mission Coffee Roasting House

151 Washington Blvd., Fremont

(510) 474-1004

 

Saturdays, Feb 1 – Apr 11

Free Tax Preparation

1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

For households earning $56,000 or less

Photo ID and tax documents required

Fremont Main Library

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont

(510) 745-1421

www.aclibrary.org

 

Sunday-Saturday, Feb 1 – Mar 27

Studio 820

During library hours

SLZ Adult School watercolor class exhibit

San Leandro Main Library

300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro

(510) 577-3971

www.sanleandro.org/depts/library/default.asp

 

Tuesday, Feb 4 – Saturday Feb 8

Madagascar Jr.

Tues/Wed: 8 p.m., Thurs/Fri: 7 p.m.

Tues, Creekside; Wed, Canyon; Thurs, Proctor; Fri, Palomares

Sat: Various times and schools

11 a.m. Proctor, 2 p.m. Palomares, 5 p.m. Canyon, 8 p.m. Creekside

Musical about animals escaping Central Park Zoo

Castro Valley Center for the Arts

19501 Redwood Rd., Castro Valley

(510) 889-8961

bactheatre.org

 

Wednesdays & Thursdays, Feb 5 – Apr 15

AARP Tax Assistance R

10 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Free tax preparation and e-filing. Call for appt.

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

(510) 608-1155

https://guides.aclibrary.org/castro-valley

 

Fridays – Sundays, Feb 7 – Mar 1

Steel Magnolias $

Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.

Comedy-drama about the bond among group of Louisiana women

Chanticleers Theatre

3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 733-5483

www.chanticleers.org

 

Monday-Saturday, Feb 8 – Mar 14

New Members and Emerging Artists and Six by Two Exhibits

Mon – Wed: 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. Thurs – Sat: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Photography, mixed media, digital print, watercolor

Hayward Main Library

888 C St., Hayward

(510) 881-7980

www.haywardartscouncil.org

 

Saturdays, Feb 8 – Feb 15

Microsoft Word 2016 R

10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

2-part class to learn the basics of word processing

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

https://guides.aclibrary.org/castro-valley

 

Saturdays, Feb 8 – Feb 15

Microsoft PowerPoint 2016 R

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Create a presentation using slides, graphics, tables (2-part class)

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

https://guides.aclibrary.org/castro-valley

 

Friday nights

Laugh Track City $

8 p.m.

Fast-paced improv comedy show

Made Up Theatre

4000 Bay St., Suite B, Fremont

(510) 573-3633

https://madeuptheatre.com/

 

Saturday nights

8 p.m.

Audience-inspired improv play

Made Up Theatre

4000 Bay St., Suite B, Fremont

(510) 573-3633

https://madeuptheatre.com/

 

 

THIS WEEK:

 

Tuesday, Feb 4

Magnetic Magic

7:00 p.m. – 7:45 p.m.

Lam Science at the library

Fremont Main Library Fukaya Room A

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont

(510) 574-2063

www.aclibrary.org

 

Tuesday, Feb 4

Ayurveda Workshop

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

The Fundamentals of Ayurveda Medicine

India Community Center

525 Los Coches St., Milpitas

(408) 934-1130

www.indiacc.org

 

Wednesday, Feb 5

Toddler Time

10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Hear a story, do some chores, meet some farm animals

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Wednesday, Feb 5

AMC 10B & 12B Math Contest $R

7:00 p.m. – 8:15 p.m.

Offered for Fremont students. Register by 2/4

American High School

36300 Fremont Blvd., Fremont

(510) 796-1776 ext 57702

http://www.fuss4schools.org/amc-10b-12b-math

 

Wednesday, Feb 5

Mark Monsarrat

1 p.m.

Painting demo by plein air artist

Fremont Art Association

37697 Niles Blvd., Fremont

(510) 792-0905

www.FremontArtAssociaion.org

 

Thursday, Feb 6

Lunar New Year’s Celebration

9 a.m. and 10 a.m.

Students in grades 2-5 perform

Schafer Park Elementary

26268 Flamingo Ave., Hayward

(510) 723-3895

 

Thursday, Feb 6

Chocolate Tasting R

7 p.m. – 8 p.m.

CBD infused dark Belgian chocolate

Fremont Botanicals

37317 Fremont Blvd., Fremont

(510) 797-2774

eventbrite.com

 

Friday, Feb 7

Eden Area Village Member Forum & Outreach

2 p.m.

Meet members, learn how local seniors are being helped

Hayward City Hall

777 B St., Hayward

(510) 208-0410

www.edenareavillage.org

 

Friday, Feb 7

Harlem Wizards NHUSD Fundraiser $

7 p.m., Doors open 6 p.m.

Wizards play against administrators, teachers, community leaders.

James Logan High School, Pavilion

1800 H St., Union City

(510) 471-2520

https://harlemwizards.thundertix.com/events

 

Friday, Feb 7

Toddler Ramble: Let's Stay in Touch $

10:30 a.m.- 11:15 a.m.

Kids 1 to 3 explore sensory play

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward

(510) 670-7270

www.haywardrec.org/hayshore.html

 

Friday, Feb 7

Sing Me Home $

7 p.m.

Opera about a group of animals who live in unity

performed by Montessori School of Fremont

Jackson Theater, Smith Center at Ohlone College

43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont

(510) 659-6031

http://montessori-fremont.com/opera.html

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Studio 820

1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Reception: SLZ Adult School watercolor class exhibit

San Leandro Main Library

300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro

(510) 577-3971

www.sanleandro.org/depts/library/default.asp

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Stilt Walkers

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Improve your balance

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

A Fungus Among Us

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Look for these life forms and learn about their importance

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Farm Chores for Kids

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Crack corn, feed the animals, help with morning chores

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

New Members and Emerging Artists

2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Artists reception sponsored by Hayward Arts Council

Hayward Main Library

888 C St., Hayward

(510) 881-7980

www.haywardartscouncil.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Movie Night $

7:30 p.m.

“The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse”, “Ask Father”, “The Cowboy Sheik”

Niles Essanay Theater

37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont

(510) 494-1411

www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Cart of Curiosities

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Find the cart filled with wonders of cultural and natural history

Coyote Hills

8000 Patterson Ranch Road, Fremont

(510) 544-3220

www.ebparks.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Sunrise Hike

6:30 a.m.- 8:00 a.m.

Explore the beauty of Coyote Hills at sunrise. Ages 12+

Coyote Hills

8000 Patterson Ranch Rd., Fremont

(510) 544-3220

www.ebparks.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

The Sacred and the Profane

7 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Organ concert featuring Ronald McKean

Old Mission San Jose

43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont

(510) 659-6158

missionsanjose.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Free Dental Checkup for Adults and Children with Disabilities R

9:00 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Dental screening, cleaning, oral health kit

Union City Dental Clinic

1203 J St., Union City

(510) 489-5200

www.gskas2020.eventzilla.net

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Second Saturday Author Series

2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Tish Davidson reads from her books on African-American history

Half Price Books

39152 Fremont Blvd., Fremont

(510) 744-0333

www.cwc-fremontareawriters.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Open Wide Our Hearts – Embracing Diversity R

9:30 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Speaker Moin Shaiq – open conversation with your neighbor

Dominican Sisters of Mission San Jose

43326 Mission Blvd., Fremont

(510) 933-6335

http://bit.ly/2019OpnWdHrts

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Education Summit 2020 R

9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Presentations/workshops for African American, Asian, Latino, Native American middle school, high school and community college students

Cal State East Bay, Gymnasium

25800 Carlos Bee Blvd., Hayward

(510) 885-3000

https://education-summit-2020

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Documentary Film “Bedlam”

1:30 p.m.

Emotional stories of people fighting severe mental illness

Niles Discovery Church of Fremont

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont

(510) 797-0895

www.nilesdiscoverychurch.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Art Demo

2 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Painter and ceramicist Azar Vaghefi depicts nature, color and light in her creations

Adobe Art Center

20395 San Miguel Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 881-6735

www.adobegallery.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Valentine Singles Dance $

8 p.m. – 12 midnight

Meet your valentine

Crowne Plaza Hotel

777 Bellew Dr., Milpitas

(510) 946-4005

www.ThePartyHotline.com

 

Saturday, Feb 8

All Fur Love Pet Adoption Event

11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Pet adoption and care, animal safety laws, pet family photos

Hayward Animal Shelter

16 Barnes Ct., Hayward

(510) 293-7200

www.haywardanimals.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Science Explorers: Weather and Climate

12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Explore science with fun and exciting experiments. Ages. 7+

Centerville Library

3801 Nicolet Ave., Fremont

(510) 795-2629

www.aclibrary.org

 

Saturday, Feb 8

Love Note Holder R

9 a.m. – 12 noon

Project to hold Valentine cards and treats

Union City Lowes

32040 Union Landing Blvd., Union City

(510) 476-0600

www.lowes.com/store/CA-Union-City/1132

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Gorgeous Goats

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Help with exercising and grooming the goats

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Victorian Table Top Games

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Play a game of ball and cup, tops, or Jacob's Ladder

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Wake Up the Farm

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Help prepare a snack for the sheep and goats

Ardenwood Historic Farm

34600 Ardenwood Blvd., Fremont

(510) 544-2797

www.ebparks.org

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Variety is the Spice of Life

3 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Reception. Art pieces by Jaci Daskarolis

Mission Coffee Roasting House

151 Washington Blvd., Fremont

(510) 474-1004

www.fremontcoffee.com

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Laurel & Hardy Talkie Matinee $

4 p.m.

“Love Business”, “Men O'War”, “The Pip from Pittsburgh”, “Twice Two”

Niles Essanay Theater

37417 Niles Blvd, Fremont

(510) 494-1411

www.nilesfilmmuseum.org

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Surmala Hindustani Classical Music Concert $

1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Enjoy afternoon of relaxing music with renowned musicians

India Community Center

525 Los Coches St., Milpitas

(408) 934-1130

www.indiacc.org

 

Sunday, Feb 9

Bird Walk: Long Live the King $

8:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Walk the Winton trailhead during king tide

Hayward Shoreline Interpretive Center

4901 Breakwater Ave., Hayward

(510) 670-7270

www.haywardrec.org/hayshore.html

 

Sunday, Feb 9

“Black Comedy” Sneak Peak

2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Scene from Douglas Morrisson Theatre's production, talk with actors

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

www.aclibrary.org

 

Monday, Feb 10

Outdoor Discoveries: Nature Hearts R

10:30 a.m. – 12 noon

Preschool and home school nature series. Ages 4-8

Sunol Regional Wilderness

1895 Geary Rd., Sunol

(510) 544-3249

www.ebparks.org

 

Monday, Feb 10

Forum

7 p.m.

Candidates for Alameda County Supervisor District 1

Fremont City Hall

3300 Capitol Ave., Fremont

(510) 284-4000

www.lwvfnuc.org

 

Monday, Feb 10

Lawyer in the Library R

6 p.m.

Free 20 min. consultation

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

www.aclibrary.org

 

Monday, Feb 10

Free Food Distribution

1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Fresh food for families in need

Sponsored by Alameda County Food Bank

Eden Greenway Park

25625 Cypress Ave., Hayward

(800) 870-3663

 

Tuesday, Feb 11

Dispute Resolution

6:30 p.m.

Better Business Bureau can help resolve disputes

Fremont Main Library

2400 Stevenson Blvd., Fremont

(510) 745-1421

www.aclibrary.org

 

Tuesday, Feb 11

Celebrating 100 Years

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

League of Women Voters presents history of women’s suffrage

Castro Valley Library

3600 Norbridge Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 667-7900

www.aclibrary.org

 

Tuesday, Feb 11

Ayurveda Workshop

6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Understanding your metabolism better

India Community Center

525 Los Coches St., Milpitas

(408) 934-1130

www.indiacc.org

 

Friday, Feb 14

Everlasting Love R

6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Co-hosted by Stepping Stones and Creekside Community Church

RSVP by Feb. 7

Creekside Community Church

951 MacArthur Blvd., San Leandro

kathy@creeksidecommunity.org

 

 

California wants to buy huge ranch to create new state park

AP Wire Service

 

LIVERMORE, Calif. (AP), Jan 11 – A pristine, 80-square-mile ranch within an hour's drive of San Francisco is up for sale for the first time in 85 years and California wants to acquire the property to create one of the largest state parks in decades.

 

When Gov. Gavin Newsom announced his $222 billion proposed state budget on Friday, he mentioned that he wants legislative leaders to dedicate $20 million from a one-time surplus to help purchase new public parkland. Newsom declined to say where the new park might be, suggesting the asking price could “go up” if he revealed details.

 

For several days, 17 lawmakers in the San Francisco Bay Area have been urging Newsom to appropriate $20 million to help acquire and preserve the N3 Ranch near Livermore, the Los Angeles Times reports.

 

If approved, the money would help complete a purchase package which includes a $30-million commitment from The Nature Conservancy and The Trust for Public Lands.

 

“This is a matter of urgent concern because this irreplaceable property is for sale now,” Democratic Sen. Steve Glazer said in a statement. “Nonprofit conservation groups have assembled funding commitments that could finance more than half the cost. We need to move on this quickly.”

 

Two Southern California sisters put the rarely-visited ranch on the real estate market in July 2019 with the asking price of $72 million.

 

Cattle still roam the property, which comes with a four-bedroom headquarters, a one-bedroom annex, a bunkhouse, shops, outbuildings, four cabins for employee housing and 14 hunting cabins. The Alameda Creek watershed runs through the property, capturing drinking water for Bay Area residents. The habitat is home to elk, deer and hundreds of species of migrating birds.

 

“It's quite a place,” said Todd Renfrew, broker and principal owner of Vacaville-based California Outdoor Properties. “This is a landscape that looks like it did more than a century ago.”

 

 

Film explores mental health crisis

Submitted by Niles Discovery Church

 

Psychiatrist turned filmmaker Kenneth Rosenberg examines a national health crisis in the film Bedlam, which will be shown Saturday, February 8 as part of the Second Saturday Documentary Series. Following the film, there will be a discussion moderated by the Rev. Barbara Meyers, a community minister specializing in Mental Health.

 

“For centuries, we, individuals and families living with serious mental illness, have suffered in silence and shame,” said Rosenberg. “We can no longer be ashamed, and we can no longer stay silent.”

 

An Official Selection in 2019 for the Sundance Film festival, Bedlam follows the emotional stories of people fighting severe mental illnesses as they are pushed into the paths of police officers, ER doctors and nurses, lawyers, and prison guards. This film shines a light on the events that led to the closing of mental institutions from the 1950s to the 1980s and left a skeletal mental health support system in their wake.

 

“The mentally ill are falling through the cracks of American society landing in jails, sleeping in parks or on sidewalks, or disappearing completely,” said the Rev. Jeffrey Spencer, senior pastor at Niles Discovery Church. “All while we wait for solutions from policy makers and Big Pharma.”

 

The Second Saturday Documentary Series is co-sponsored by Niles Discovery Church and the San Jose Peace and Justice Center. To learn more, call (510) 797-0895 or visit http://bit.ly/nilesssds.

 

“Bedlam” Showcasing Mental Health Crisis

Saturday, Feb 8

1:30 p.m.

Niles Discovery Church

36600 Niles Blvd., Fremont

(510) 797-0895

http://bit.ly/nilesssds

 

 

Montressori Opera performance

Submitted by Sofia Zuniga and Yazhini Rajesh

 

Explore deep in the Arctic with this year’s Montessori School of Fremont children’s opera “Sing Me Home,” held February 7 at the Jackson Theater at Ohlone College. Every year, parents, teachers and elementary students at MSF come together to create an experience that you will never forget. This heartfelt opera is not only written but also composed and choreographed by Mr. and Mrs. Bokhout, who have been professionally trained. They have been helping the children grow more confident on stage and have been teaching them that you can achieve anything you set your mind to.

 

“Sing Me Home” is a story about a group of animals who live in unity. When a young storyteller stumbles upon their cave, he laughs at their dances and embarrasses them, prompting the animals to curse his first-born child with deafness so that the child would be unable to hear his father’s stories and life lessons.

 

The father mourns and watches his child grow up being made fun of and believing he is different and worse than everyone else. Tupilek, the village elder, is convinced that the boy needs to show in some way that he is worthy and can contribute to the village. The father then takes his son, Suinnak, on a walrus hunt. Suinnak gets separated from the group in a storm and meets the animals.

 

Tikaani, Suinnak’s only friend, convinces the village there is still hope and devises a plan to get him back. She asks the village to dance the traditional eagle dance, hoping that Suinnak will be able to see their dance and come back. In the end, Suinnak comes back to the village, realizing that he does have a purpose.

 

Tickets may be purchased online at https://montessori-fremont.com/opera. General admission is $20; children under three are free if they can sit in a parent’s lap.

 

‘Sing Me Home’ Montressori Children’s Opera

Friday, Feb 7

7 p.m.

Jackson Theater, Smith Center, Ohlone College

43600 Mission Blvd., Fremont

(510) 490-0919

http://montessori-fremont.com/opera.html

$20 General Admission (FREE for children under 3)

 

 

Music at the Mission Chamber Rock

Submitted by Vickilyn Hussey

 

Music lovers, your Valentine’s Day is going to ROCK with an exciting intermingling of classical and rock music at the upcoming Music at the Mission Chamber Players concert, “Chamber Rock”! The virtuosic classical chamber music ensemble, in its Fifteenth Anniversary Season, celebrates rock’s roots in blues, and 1960s and 70s rock masterpieces influenced by classical music, plus recent classical works that take their cues from the same popular roots as rock and roll.

 

“We tend to categorize music: classical music is here, and rock or jazz goes over there. I think one of the great awakenings in the composition world has been the breaking down of these barriers, and the realization that great music is just great music,” explained Bill Everett, Artistic Director of Music at the Mission.

 

“In the 1960s, there was quite a bit of classical influence in the rock world. Some of it was quite direct, such as Emerson Lake and Palmer’s exploration of everything from Copland to Ginastera. Others, like Pink Floyd and King Crimson, looked to avant-garde composers for ideas on how to expand their own voices. The second half of this program will be exploring these rock song writing pioneers, and giving them their due as great composers in their own right.

 

“I’m really looking forward to Steve Huber’s arrangement of ‘Crossroads.’ So much of what happened in the rock world in the 1960s, from Led Zeppelin to Hendrix to Clapton, was directly influenced by the few recordings made by Robert Johnson over thirty years earlier…Covered by so many rock bands, the story [of Crossroads] says so much: coming to a crossroads in the middle of nowhere, and selling your soul to the devil for rockgod-like guitar chops. It’s a story that’s popped up in classical music many times, too!”

 

The first half of the concert program will explore American classical composers who drew influence from the same sources as rock, blues and jazz musicians, to develop a voice that was distinctly American. Opening the concert, Grammy-honored composer John Adams’ “Road Movies” is a finely tuned balancing act of three distinctive movements that encompass a range of emotions, a driving uncertainty and solitary isolation, climaxing in an incredible “big, perpetual motion machine” of swing, “somewhere between an Ives ragtime and a long rideout by the Goodman orchestra circa 1939,” according to Adams. “It is very difficult for violin and piano to maintain over the seven-minute stretch, especially in the tricky cross-hand style of the piano part,” he said. “Relax and leave the driving to us.”

 

“Café Music” by Paul Schoenfield, on the other hand, is a more traditional light-hearted, mile-a-minute romp, saluting musical styles ranging from 1920s American jazz to Broadway. “If I imagine myself kicking back in a bar at the end of the world, this is exactly the music I’d want played.” (Brin Solomon, “Music Monday”)

 

The concert showcases the ensemble’s cross-over stars: violist Chad Kaltinger, member of three-time Grammy nominated Quartet San Francisco; violinist Steve Huber, who reveals his lighter side with The Pirates Charles; violinist Matt Szemela, praised by the “New York Times” for his “outrageous fiddling;” Adelle-Akiko Kearns, cello; Bill Everett, double bass; Aileen Chanco, piano; and guest artist Jim Kassis, percussion.

 

Concert details are available online, and tickets may be purchased in advance or at the door.

 

Music at the Mission Chamber Rock

Friday, Feb 14

7:15 p.m. Pre-Concert Talk

8:00 p.m. Concert

Old Mission San Jose

43300 Mission Blvd, Fremont

(510) 402-1724

www.musicatmsj.org

Tickets: $15 – $50

 

 

Thanks for a job well done!

Submitted by Newark PD

 

During the January 23 Newark City Council meeting, Police Officers Omar Pacheco, Salvador Hernandez and Karl Fredstrom were honored for deploying life saving measures during a medical call and reviving a victim that was unconscious. The trio received a standing ovation for their work and dedication.

 

 

Newark Police Log

Submitted by Newark PD

 

Saturday, January 25

  • At 4:03 a.m. a residential burglary was reported on the 5700 block of Rose Court.

 

Sunday, January 26

  • At 6:00 p.m. a vehicle was reported stolen on the 7600 block of Thornton Ave.

 

Monday, January 27

  • At 3:00 a.m. a residential burglary was reported on the 35700 block of Bettencourt St.
  • At 5:21 p.m. a residential burglary was reported on the 34800 block of Newark Blvd.

 

Tuesday, January 28

  • At 6:45 a.m. a misdemeanor assault was reported on the 5600 block of Forbes Drive.

 

Wednesday, January 29

  • At 5:03 p.m. a vehicle was reported stolen on the 7200 block of Thornton Ave.

 

Thursday, January 30

  • At 11:45 a.m. a residential burglary was reported on the 39900 block of Cedar Blvd.

 

 

Officer involved shooting

Submitted by Lt. Steve Mendez, Union City PD

 

On January 31, 2019, at approximately 6:48 p.m., the Fremont Police Department responded to a reported robbery in-progress at the Sephora Store at Pacific Commons in Fremont. As officers arrived, they located the suspect vehicle from the reported robbery. A pursuit was initiated which led the Fremont officers to Balmoral Street in Union City.

 

The suspect vehicle drove into a cul-de-sac at the end of Balmoral Street, where an officer involved shooting occurred involving a Fremont police officer. There were three suspects from the suspected robbery in the vehicle. Two suspects received non-life-threatening injuries and were transported to local area hospitals; both are expected to survive. The third suspect was taken into custody at the scene. No officers were injured as a result of this incident.

 

This incident is still under investigation; the officer’s name and the name of the involved suspects are not being released at this time. The Union City Police Department will be taking lead on the investigation of the officer involved shooting. The Alameda County District Attorney’s office will be conducting a parallel investigation.

 

Any witnesses to the crime in Fremont, the officer involved shooting in Union City, or any part of this incident are encouraged to contact Detective Adalberto Alberto at (510) 675-2220 or via email at adalbertoa@unioncity.org. Information can also be left on our anonymous tip line – (510) 675-5207 or via email at tips@unioncity.org.

 

 

Spanish Organ Concert ‘Lo Sagrado y Lo Profano’

Submitted by Gary Dorighi

 

Old Mission San Jose will host “Lo Sagrado y Lo Profano” (The Sacred and the Profane), a free organ concert featuring the Rosales Opus 14 organ on February 8. Ronald McKean, St. Joseph Parish music director, explores the dualism of sacred and secular Spanish Organ music of the 17th century. In this concert, you will hear intricate and choral-like pieces that represent battles, dances, and chant-based works.

 

The organ was delivered to Old Mission San Jose in 1989, but its arrival was the cumulation of 171 years of waiting! The Mission’s original request for an organ was denied by the Bishop of Mexico in 1819, but when the Mission was being restored in the 1980’s, preservationist Kerry Quaid decided the historical site needed an appropriate musical instrument. The current Rosales Opus 14 was carefully constructed with a keyboard and stops that reflect 19th century sound, and a brightly painted Greco-Roman design.

 

McKean will give a pre-concert talk at 7 p.m. to explain how the Rosales organ, one of only three in the US, authentically renders the music style of this period. The 7:30 p.m. concert will be delivered within the inspiring and acoustically pure Old Mission Church. A reception with wine, Spanish Tapas, desserts, and beverages will follow in the historic setting of the Old Mission museum.

 

Spanish Organ Concert ‘Lo Sagrado y Lo Profano’

Saturday, Feb 8

7 p.m.

Old Mission San Jose

43300 Mission Blvd., Fremont

(510) 657-1797

https://missionsanjose.org

 

 

Cops and noodles? Yes, indeed!

Submitted by Hayward PD

 

What better way to meet a new friend than to enjoy a quick bite to eat with them? That’s the idea behind a “Pancit With the Police” community meet-and-greet gathering planned by the Hayward Police Department.

 

The informal event is set for Thursday, February 20 at Seafood City Supermarket near Southland Mall in Hayward The meeting is part of the National Coffee With a Cop program where community members can ask questions or voice neighborhood concerns with members of the Hayward Police Department in a relaxed setting.

 

The 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. event will be in the supermarket’s food court area where guests will have a chance to sample Pancit, a Filipino noodle dish, while meeting with police officials. No formal presentation is planned, so people are free to drop by anytime during the event.

 

Pancit With the Police

Thursday, Feb 20

3 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Community meet-and-greet

Seafood City, 24536 Hesperian Blvd., Hayward

(510) 293-5051

Free

 

 

PG&E offering more than 150 college scholarships

Submitted by Tamar Sarkissian

 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) announced on January 23 that scholarship applications are being accepted for college-bound high schoolers as well as current college and continuing education students living in Northern and Central California.

 

More than 150 awards totaling nearly $500,000 are being made available through PG&E scholarships, which includes the employee resource group (ERG), engineering network group (ENG) and Better Together STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) scholarship programs.

 

“Helping students in our communities attend college and achieve their goals is a big step toward improving lives. These individuals, many of whom are the first in their families to attend college, will be the leaders and innovators of tomorrow. We’re proud to invest in these promising young people,” said Mary King, PG&E vice president of human resources and chief diversity officer.

 

PG&E scholarships are awarded annually to help offset the cost of higher education. ERG scholarship winners will receive awards ranging from $1,000 to $7,000 for exemplary scholastic achievement and community leadership. Better Together STEM Scholarship recipients will receive a one-time scholarship of $1,000 to $10,000 to assist in their pursuit of higher education in engineering, computer science, cybersecurity or environmental sciences.

 

Since 1989, PG&E’s ERGs and ENGs have awarded more than $4.5 million in scholarships to thousands of recipients. The funds are raised completely through employee donations, employee fundraising events and Campaign for the Community, the company’s employee giving program.

 

Since 2012, PG&E’s Better Together STEM scholarship program has given nearly $3.6 million to accomplished students based on a combined demonstration of community leadership, personal triumph, financial need and academic achievement.

 

Funds for Better Together STEM scholarships come from the PG&E Foundation, which is dedicated to supporting charities that address critical social, educational and environmental challenges in the company’s service area. These scholarships are supported by PG&E shareholders.

 

More than 5,000 PG&E employees belong to the ERGs and ENGs. Each group helps further the company’s commitment to serving its communities and growing employee engagement.

 

PG&E’s ERG and ENG scholarships are available through these 12 groups:

 

  • Access Network (individuals with disabilities)
  • Asian
  • Black
  • Latino
  • Legacy (tenured employees)
  • National Society of Black Engineers (STEM career employees)
  • NuEnergy (new employees)
  • PrideNetwork (LGBT employees)
  • Samahan (Filipino)
  • Society for Hispanic Professional Engineers (STEM career employees)
  • Veterans
  • Women’s Network

 

In addition to the PG&E scholarships, the Pacific Service Employees Association (PSEA), a non-profit mutual benefit organization serving PG&E employees and retirees, also provides scholarships for dependents of company employees.

 

The deadline to apply for a scholarship is February 7, 2020. PG&E scholarships information, including criteria and applications can be found by visiting the PG&E website at www.pge.com, then typing “scholarship opportunities” into the search field and clicking on the “PG&E STEM scholarships for college students” link.

 

 

Cutter name to chair transportation commission

Submitted by Alameda County Transportation Commission

 

At its first Commission meeting of 2020, the Alameda County Transportation Commission (Alameda CTC) unanimously elected City of San Leandro Mayor Pauline Cutter as its chairperson.

 

“I am so pleased to be elected to serve as chairperson of the Alameda County Transportation Commission,” says Cutter, who has been a member of the commission since 2012 and vice chairperson since 2018. “It is an honor to lead Alameda CTC in partnership with my colleagues, as we continue to drive forward transportation excellence with acclaimed projects and programs throughout Alameda County.”

 

Upon taking this leadership role, Cutter outlined several priorities such as:

  • Advancement of high profile multi-jurisdictional, multimodal corridor improvements
  • Improving transit options throughout the county to provide a reliable and connected system
  • Ensuring safe mobility options for bicyclists and pedestrians
  • Pushing forward rail strategy in partnership with other agencies, importantly the Countywide Rail Safety Enhancement Program
  • Expansion of model educational and supportive programs like Safe Routes to Schools and the Affordable Student Transit Pass program
  • Closing gaps in our trails network
  • Expansion of express lanes

 

The chairperson is elected to serve a one-year term. A complete list of commissioners may be found online at https://www.alamedactc.org/about-us/commission/.

 

 

Shape Our Fremont

Latest Housing News

 

January has been a busy month for housing developments. Here are some updates on old and new developments across the city.

 

GPA Recommendations

During the Planning Commission meeting on January 23, the commissioners considered two General Plan Amendment (GPA) Screening Requests to change General Plan Land Use Designations. After hearing comments from all parties, they recommended to deny authorization of both.

 

The Rex Homes request wanted the city to consider changing the vacant lot at 34600 Niles Boulevard in Niles from Private Open Space to Low Density Residential in order to build five single-family houses. This request met opposition from residents and the commission who pointed out the property had been designated as private open space as part of a planned housing development in 1971. Several people said they felt the open space complemented the California Nursery park plans across the street. Several others were concerned that the adjacent intersection of Niles Boulevard and Nursery Avenue was one of the most congested in Fremont and building individual homes with individual driveways on the corner would add to the congestion and cause an unsafe situation. The commission unanimously recommended the request not be authorized to move forward with a formal proposal.

 

The Ellsworth Residential request asked the city to consider changing the two vacant lots at 43401 and 43431 Ellsworth Street in Mission San Jose from Town Center Commercial to Low-Medium Density Residential in order to build 16 detached multi-family houses. This request also generated a great deal of discussion — both for and against. Opponents argued the two properties had been designated commercial for decades, and that a study of commercial opportunities in the Town Center recommended both sides of Ellsworth from Washington to Anza be developed as a primary commercial area with an emphasis on restaurants and retail businesses. The developer countered that he felt the area would not sustain commercial buildings and offered to contribute $1 million to revitalize existing businesses as an incentive. By a vote of 3 to 2, the commission recommended the request not be authorized to move forward.

 

Residents may still send their comments on either of these requests to city staff planner Hang Zhou at hzhou@fremont.gov. Both requests will be heard by the city council at 7 p.m. Tuesday, February 18.

 

What Happened to …?

Sometimes housing development proposals get approved, and then seem to drop out of sight. Here are a few updates on previously approved projects in Centerville as examples.

 

The City Center Apartments proposal to build 60 affordable housing apartments across from Washington High School is expected to be completed in 2021. The Thornton Avenue Mixed Use proposal for 54 market-rate condominiums and 7,390 square feet of commercial space near Dale's Hardware has not started construction yet. And the developer of The Cottages proposal for 7 single-family houses and 30 duet units on Blacow Road near the railroad tracks recently asked for a time extension.

 

Finally, the SummerHill Apartment Communities' preliminary proposal to develop the Centerville location of the Century House and the former Minerva's Restaurant has not been submitted as a formal application. At this time, it is the city's understanding that SummerHill is no longer interested in pursuing development of the site.

 

Housing Plans Elsewhere

Fremont is not the only city having to deal with housing problems. For example, at San Jose State University the lack of affordable housing affects both students and faculty. Students often have to drive long distances from home, and a significant number of them are essentially homeless — sleeping on friends' sofas or in hidden corners of the campus. Some prospective faculty have been reluctant to take positions at the university because of the high cost of housing in the area. To address this problem, the university recently announced plans to tear down a little-used state-owned building near campus and build 800 to 1,200 apartments for faculty, staff, and students. Most units would be rented for below market value.

 

And overseas in Vienna, Austria, the city controls about half of the housing. Part is owned by the city and rented at levels that are affordable for both middle-income and low-income residents. An equal part is owned and managed by private nonprofit developers under the direction of the city. These developers include housing cooperatives and labor unions that have an interest in providing housing for people at all levels of income.

__

 

For the latest updates to housing news, visit www.ShapeOurFremont.com.

 

 

Pre-scheduling arranged for sports physicals

Submitted by Michelle Stone

 

In an effort to decrease wait times, sports physicals, hosted by Washington Sports Medicine (Washington Hospital Healthcare System), will pre-schedule physical exams on Wednesday, February 5 (3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.) and Thursday, February 6 (3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.). Specific time slots will be guaranteed with approximately 84 slots per day. Physical evaluation forms, available at www.whhs.com/services/sports must be signed by a parent or guardian prior to arrival. Walk-ups will be given a specific time to return, avoiding a lengthy wait. Athletes from all sports are welcome.

 

Sports Physicals

 

Wednesday, Feb 5

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Newark Memorial High School Library

39375 Cedar Blvd, Newark

 

Thursday, Feb 6

3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Irvington High School Library

41800 Blacow Rd, Fremont

 

www.whhs.com/services/sports

Mike Rogers (510) 818-7320

Cost: $20

 

 

Learn to Square Dance

Submitted by Alvin Minard

 

The Farmers and Farmerettes Square Dance Club will provide square dance lessons at the Newark Pavilion beginning February 5 and continuing on Wednesday evenings for thirteen weeks.

 

Square Dancing is one of the few dances that originated in America. It was adapted from the Virginia reel and expanded during the wagon train journeys to the west. Now the dance is done the same way around the world, with four couples in one square and a caller who tells them where they are supposed to move. Some common square dance calls are “swing your partner” and “circle left,” but there are also some complex calls that take a while to master like, “Load the Boat” and “Ferris Wheel.” All calls used during lessons will be explained and practiced.

 

If you can walk you can square dance. There are no physically demanding dance steps. This is a fun activity that gives you exercise, mental challenges to remember what to do for each call, and interaction with other people physically and socially. Many women wear skirts with petticoats which give volume and flare out when dancers spin, but this is not required. In fact, some women square dancers wear “prairie skirts” that come almost to the floor. Men are encouraged to wear long sleeve shirts because dancers will touch arms and sweat can be an issue. This activity is smoke and alcohol free.

 

This is a couple’s activity, but we do not care who makes up the “couple.” A couple can be two people of the same sex, friends, family members – you choose. However, many of the calls are “sex” defined, such as “Ladies circulate.” So you will need to decide ahead of time which partner will be doing which role. You can start the class without a partner and simply “borrow” someone to dance with you, which is not usually a problem.

 

When you have learned some of the basic calls you will be able to attend square dance festivals in other areas of the city, county, state, nation or world. The Farmers and Famerettes dance almost every Wednesday night at Newark Pavilion main hall (with air conditioning).

 

Most of the dancers in our club have been dancing for many years, some of them for thirty years or more, and they still come out every week and sometimes on the weekend at festivals to enjoy this activity.

 

Please give Square Dancing a try. The first lesson in February is FREE. After the first week’s lessons there will be a reasonable fee for the rest of the classes to cover the cost of the hall and the caller. The Farmers and Farmerettes Square Dance Club is a member of the Northern California Square Dance Association.

 

Square Dance Lessons

Starts Wednesday, Feb 5

6:30 p.m.

Newark Pavilion

6430 Thornton Ave, Newark

(510) 793-7015

http://www.farmersandfarmerettes.org/

First lesson FREE

 

 

Chanticleers presents Steel Magnolias

Submitted by Steve Wilner

 

Friendship never goes out of style! Chanticleers Theatre is proud to present Steel Magnolias, a play by Robert Harling, starting Friday, February 7.

 

Make an appointment at Truvy’s beauty salon where the ladies of Chinquapin meet to get their hair done and let their hair down. Through the clouds of hairspray and the buzz of blow dryers, six Southern spitfires swap gossip, wisecracks, and wisdom in this hilarious and heartwarming comedy that explores the bonds of friendship and the strength of women. Full of sass, style and sisterhood, Steel Magnolias will make you laugh ‘til you cry with its big characters, big hair, and even bigger heart.

 

Director, actor, and designer spanning four decades in West Coast theatre, Kendall Tieck will make his Chanticleers Theatre directing debut with Steel Magnolias. Tieck explains, “The success of the play and the movie can be attributed to the story of six women and their relationships as they navigate some of life’s greatest challenges together. Through a well-crafted script, and a set of endearing characters, men and women alike will find the moments of comedy and drama unfolding together in a heart-warming, uplifting story of life.”

 

Tieck will be supported in bringing this vision to the stage with Scenic and Lighting Design by Jon Gourdine and Costume Design by Amy Cook. Performing in Steel Magnolias will be Jamie Strube as “Shelby,” Anya Cherniss as “Annelle,” Julie Etzel as “M’Lynn,” Cynthia Lagodzinski as “Truvy,” Eve Tieck as “Ouiser,” and Sally Hogarty as “Clairee.”

 

The show will run from February 7 through March 1: Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. All performances will take place at Chanticleers Theater in Castro Valley. Tickets are $22 – 27 each and may be purchased online at https://chanticleers.org/ or by phone at (510) 733-5483. Group discounts are also available.

 

Steel Magnolias

Saturday, Feb 7 – Sunday, Mar 1

Fri & Sat: 8 p.m.

Sun: 2 p.m.

Chanticleers Theater

3683 Quail Ave., Castro Valley

(510) 733-5483

https://chanticleers.org/

Tickets: $22 – 27

 

 

Girls just want to do STEM

By Stephanie Gertsch

 

On Saturday morning, local 3rd – 5th grade girls and their moms were having a blast launching mini rockets, learning about the senses, dusting for fingerprints, building towers out of pasta, and experimenting with polymers and density. Since 1991, the Fremont branch of American Association of University Women (AAUW) has been holding “Stem Discovery Day” to introduce girls to science in a relaxed and hands-on setting. Especially in the Bay Area, STEM career opportunities are expanding, but women are still underrepresented. Stem Discovery Day is a way of communicating to children that science is for everyone regardless of gender.

 

Previously, the event was always held in Fremont, but this year’s February 1 event took place at Caesar Chavez Middle School in Union City. Students rotated between seven workshops, each with an activity from a different field of science. In a workshop on the five senses, kids tried to guess the flavors of gum while blindfolded. In another, they built towers of pasta and tested them in a makeshift wind tunnel. In the popular forensic workshop, kids learned how to dust for fingerprints and then used their skills to determine which of their moms had “stolen” some chocolate and left an incriminating thumbprint behind.

 

PhD students from Stanford held a workshop on polymers (through studying the absorbency of diapers), and Engineering for Kids helped students build and troubleshoot mini rockets. However, the majority of workshops were hosted by local high school students who were alumni of AAUW’s Stem Trek scholarship program – a weeklong summer camp at Stanford for 7th grade girls.

 

Having older students give back by teaching not only helps develop leadership skills, but also shows the next round of students that they have role models to look up to. “You see [the presenters] so poised, so confident, but they all started like you,” AAUW member Letha Saldanha told the younger children. “I’ve known many of them; some of them used to attend this event, and then they joined again to start presenting.”

 

John Thompson, superintendent of New Haven Unified School District, also spoke at the event. A former science teacher, he was enthusiastic when Saldanha got in touch with him. He said, “One of the things I always struggled with when I was teaching science quite a few years ago was I would see these students at the school—girls—that I knew should have been in my science classes, had the potential to be scientists, and I couldn’t talk them into taking the higher level sciences.”

 

AAUW’s next Stem Discovery Day will be on March 21 at Walters Middle School in Fremont. Registration will be available starting in mid-February, 2020. More information can be found on the AAUW website https://fremont-ca.aauw.net/, and the organization can be contacted at AAUWFremontBranch@gmail.com.

 

 

Studio 820 Exhibit

Submitted by Ann Schmidt

 

“Studio 820,” the San Lorenzo Adult School Watercolor Class will be exhibiting students’ watercolor paintings at the San Leandro Main Library from February 1 to March 27. There will be a reception on Saturday, February 8, from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. to meet the artists. Many original watercolor paintings will be for sale, a good time to add some original local art to your collection.

 

Many of the artists are longtime residents of San Leandro, San Lorenzo, Castro Valley. Hayward and Fremont. All are currently enrolled in the San Lorenzo Adult School Watercolor class.

 

Studio 820 Exhibit

Saturday, Feb 1 to Friday, Mar 27

During Library Hours

 

Artists Reception

Saturday, Feb 8: 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

 

San Leandro Main Library

300 Estudillo Ave., San Leandro

(510) 577-3970

https://www.sanleandro.org/depts/library/

 

 

Online resources can help taxpayers navigate changes

Submitted by Daniel Tahara

 

Tax season is in full swing at the Franchise Tax Board (FTB). FTB wants to alert California taxpayers to changes for this year and encourages everyone to take advantage of online services to file taxes and secure their refunds as quickly as possible.

 

“More people will qualify for state tax credits this year, and there are free tax assistance programs available to Californians,” said State Controller and FTB Chair Betty T. Yee. “Visit the Franchise Tax Board online to learn about free tax preparation sites, e-file options, valuable tax credits, and more.”

 

California Earned Income Tax Credit and Young Child Tax Credit

This year, an estimated 3 million families are expected to claim California’s expanded Earned Income Tax Credit (CalEITC). Taxpayers with income up to $30,000 may qualify for CalEITC.

 

Those who qualify for CalEITC and have a child under the age of 6 may also receive up to $1,000 worth of the new Young Child Tax Credit (YCTC). An estimated 400,000 families may be eligible to claim YCTC.

 

Taxpayers earning less than $55,952 may also qualify for the federal EITC. Between CalEITC, YCTC and the federal EITC, a family can receive up to $8,053. CalEITC and YCTC are claimed by filing a state tax return, while federal EITC is claimed on a federal return. More details about CalEITC, YCTC and the federal EITC are available at www.CalEITC4me.org, www.ftb.ca.gov/caleitc and www.irs.gov.

 

Free Tax Help

Taxpayers may be able to get help with their taxes for free. For a list of Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program locations throughout California, go to www.ftb.ca.gov and search for “free tax help.”

 

State Individual Health Care Mandate

Beginning January 1, 2020, a new state law requires Californians to have qualifying health insurance coverage throughout the year. Those who fail to maintain qualifying coverage are subject to a penalty when they file their tax returns in 2021.

 

Generally speaking, a taxpayer who fails to secure and keep qualifying medical coverage will be subject to a penalty of $695 or more. The penalty for a dependent child is half of what it would be for an adult. The penalty for a married couple without coverage can be $1,390 or more, and the penalty for a family of four with two dependent children could be $2,085 or more.

 

For information about health coverage options and financial help, visit www.CoveredCA.com. For information about the penalty, visit www.ftb.ca.gov/healthmandate.

 

Worker Classification

The California Labor and Workforce Agency has developed a Frequently Asked Question guide that has been posted on its website at https://www.labor.ca.gov/employmentstatus/ to help the public understand Assembly Bill 5 and what it does.

 

State Tax Deduction for Disaster Losses

Disaster loss rules apply to victims in governor-declared or presidentially-declared disaster areas, most notably in areas hit by wildfires. Taxpayers may claim a disaster loss in the tax year that the disaster occurred, or by filing an amended or original return from the year prior to when the disaster occurred. FTB can more quickly issue a refund for eligible losses claimed in the prior tax year.

 

Taxpayers may claim disaster loss through e-file or file on paper. Upon request, FTB will provide replacement state tax documents for free for those who lost them as a result of a disaster.

For more information on how to file and a complete list of all disasters declared by the governor, visit www.ftb.ca.gov and search for “disaster loss.”

 

FTB Services

FTB’s online MyFTB service allows taxpayers to view their tax documents, check balances due, access tax calculators, send secure messages to FTB staff, and more. FTB offers free electronic filing for state tax returns through CalFile, an easy-to-use tool available to more than 6.5 million taxpayers. CalFile allows taxpayers to e-file directly with FTB and provides instant confirmation when the return is received. Taxpayers can find a list of other filing options at www.ftb.ca.gov.

 

Walk-in service is available at five regional FTB field offices weekdays between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. except state holidays. The field offices are in Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Ana.

 

Taxpayers can pay tax bills online using FTB’s WebPay. They can also pay using MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Discover, debit card, check, cashier’s check, or money order. A service fee of 2.3 percent is charged for credit card transactions.

 

 

Online resources can help taxpayers navigate changes

Submitted by Daniel Tahara

 

Tax season is in full swing at the Franchise Tax Board (FTB). FTB wants to alert California taxpayers to changes for this year and encourages everyone to take advantage of online services to file taxes and secure their refunds as quickly as possible.

 

“More people will qualify for state tax credits this year, and there are free tax assistance programs available to Californians,” said State Controller and FTB Chair Betty T. Yee. “Visit the Franchise Tax Board online to learn about free tax preparation sites, e-file options, valuable tax credits, and more.”

 

California Earned Income Tax Credit and Young Child Tax Credit

This year, an estimated 3 million families are expected to claim California’s expanded Earned Income Tax Credit (CalEITC). Taxpayers with income up to $30,000 may qualify for CalEITC.

 

Those who qualify for CalEITC and have a child under the age of 6 may also receive up to $1,000 worth of the new Young Child Tax Credit (YCTC). An estimated 400,000 families may be eligible to claim YCTC.

 

Taxpayers earning less than $55,952 may also qualify for the federal EITC. Between CalEITC, YCTC and the federal EITC, a family can receive up to $8,053. CalEITC and YCTC are claimed by filing a state tax return, while federal EITC is claimed on a federal return. More details about CalEITC, YCTC and the federal EITC are available at www.CalEITC4me.org, www.ftb.ca.gov/caleitc and www.irs.gov.

 

Free Tax Help

Taxpayers may be able to get help with their taxes for free. For a list of Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program locations throughout California, go to www.ftb.ca.gov and search for “free tax help.”

 

 

State Individual Health Care Mandate

Beginning January 1, 2020, a new state law requires Californians to have qualifying health insurance coverage throughout the year. Those who fail to maintain qualifying coverage are subject to a penalty when they file their tax returns in 2021.

 

Generally speaking, a taxpayer who fails to secure and keep qualifying medical coverage will be subject to a penalty of $695 or more. The penalty for a dependent child is half of what it would be for an adult. The penalty for a married couple without coverage can be $1,390 or more, and the penalty for a family of four with two dependent children could be $2,085 or more.

 

For information about health coverage options and financial help, visit www.CoveredCA.com. For information about the penalty, visit www.ftb.ca.gov/healthmandate.

 

 

Worker Classification

The California Labor and Workforce Agency has developed a Frequently Asked Question guide that has been posted on its website at https://www.labor.ca.gov/employmentstatus/ to help the public understand Assembly Bill 5 and what it does.

 

State Tax Deduction for Disaster Losses

Disaster loss rules apply to victims in governor-declared or presidentially-declared disaster areas, most notably in areas hit by wildfires. Taxpayers may claim a disaster loss in the tax year that the disaster occurred, or by filing an amended or original return from the year prior to when the disaster occurred. FTB can more quickly issue a refund for eligible losses claimed in the prior tax year.

 

Taxpayers claiming the disaster loss through e-file should follow software instructions to enter disaster information. Paper filers should write the name of the disaster in blue ink at the top of the state tax return to alert FTB to expedite the refund. Upon request, FTB will provide replacement state tax documents for free for those who lost them as a result of a disaster.

For more information and a complete list of all disasters declared by the governor, visit www.ftb.ca.gov and search for “disaster loss.”

 

FTB Services

FTB’s online MyFTB service allows taxpayers to view their tax documents, check balances due, access tax calculators, send secure messages to FTB staff, and more. FTB offers free electronic filing for state tax returns through CalFile, an easy-to-use tool available to more than 6.5 million taxpayers. CalFile allows taxpayers to e-file directly with FTB and provides instant confirmation when the return is received. Taxpayers can find a list of other filing options at www.ftb.ca.gov.

 

FTB continues to offer the Customer Service Dashboard on their website. The dashboard displays wait times for its contact centers in real-time, as well as time frames for processing refunds, payments, tax returns and correspondence. It also includes the wait time for the Tax Practitioner Hotline and MyFTB Secure Chat. This important tool will serve taxpayers and tax professionals again this year in identifying the best times to try and reach FTB agents for assistance should the need arise.

 

Walk-in service is available at five regional FTB field offices weekdays between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. except state holidays. The field offices are in Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento, San Diego, and Santa Ana.

 

Taxpayers can pay tax bills online using FTB’s WebPay. They can also pay using MasterCard, Visa, American Express, Discover, debit card, check, cashier’s check, or money order. A service fee of 2.3 percent is charged for credit card transactions.

 

 

TCHC celebrates 50th anniversary with year-end gala

Submitted by Connor Ramey

 

For 50 years, Tri-City Health Center (TCHC) has been a healthcare partner in the Fremont and surrounding areas. Starting out as a Women’s Clinic in 1970, TCHC now provides quality health services in eight locations and in more than 20 languages. Today, TCHC is home to comprehensive health care that treats the whole person. Along with medical, dental, vision and behavioral health care, TCHC offers specialized care such as acupuncture, chiropractic and podiatry.

 

On August 15, 2020 Tri-City Health Center will celebrate its first 50 years at TCHC’s “Anniversary Gala” at Ohlone College in Newark. The festivities include dinner and a reception celebrating TCHC and our accomplishments. TCHC is pleased to announce Dr. Sandra Hernandez as the keynote speaker.

 

Dr. Hernández serves as the President and Chief Executive Officer at the California Health Care Foundation. Based in San Francisco, she was the CEO of the San Francisco Foundation for 16 years before moving to her current role. She also served as the Director of Public Health for the City and County of San Francisco and co-chaired San Francisco’s Universal Healthcare Council. She was appointed to the Covered California Board of Directors in 2018 by Governor Jerry Brown, and to the Healthy California for All Commission in 2019 by Governor Gavin Newsom.

 

Registration details will be available soon. To sign up for more information go to https://tri-cityhealth.org/about/50th-anniversary-gala/.

 

Tri-City Health Center 50th Anniversary Gala

Saturday, August 15

Ohlone College, Newark Campus

(510) 770-8133

www.tri-cityhealth.org

 

 

Five-Year Strategic Plan

Submitted by Lauren Sugayan

 

The City of Union City is starting the year off with a Strategic Plan, which sets city goals through the year 2025. The Strategic Plan contains a renewed mission and vision for the city, along with five multi-year goals that will guide decision-making and resources for the next five years.

 

The five multi-year goals cover the areas of (A) Financial Stability and Sustainability, (B) Governance and Organization Effectiveness, (C) Economic, Community Development and Public Safety, (D) Environmental Sustainability and Infrastructure, and (E) Communication and Outreach.

 

Of top priority, the city council identified nine strategies for the 2020-2022 fiscal years, which include:

  • Establish a comprehensive fiscal stability and sustainability plan to address the General Fund’s long-term deficit.
  • Determine the level of reauthorization of the public safety parcel tax and develop an informational plan.
  • Reduce costs associated with the city’s fire contract with Alameda County.
  • Align the provision of critical city services and Strategic Plan implementation with current staffing levels.
  • Establish professional development plans for each employee to optimize staff resources, support their growth and demonstrate commitment to employees’ careers through a mentoring program and cross-training assignments.
  • Analyze the feasibility of transforming warehouses to attract high-value industrial and commercial uses for the benefit of the community.
  • Facilitate the build out of the greater Station District Area through the construction of the Quarry Lakes Parkway, upgrades to the BART Station, completion of the pedestrian rail crossing and the sale and development of city-owned land.
  • Develop a multi-departmental approach to address homelessness through coordination with staff, community organizations and Alameda County.
  • Conduct outreach and community education about City services, financial resources, areas of cost, and impacts of failed ballot measures.

 

Many of these strategies are well underway, including reductions in costs associated with the city’s fire contract with Alameda County by way of closing an underutilized fire station and the placement of Measure U, the city’s public safety parcel tax, on the March 3 Primary Election ballot. If approved by voters, Measure U would renew public safety funding that has been in place for 16 years.

 

Read the full Strategic Plan at www.unioncity.org/goals, and to watch a video about the Strategic Plan, visit https://youtu.be/lcN0Zzg6_90.

 

 

Union City City Council

January 28, 2020

 

Consent Agenda:

  • Approved minutes for special city council meetings on January 7, 2020, January 14, 2020 and for the regular city council meeting on January 14, 2020.
  • Passed construction change order on the flooring replacement project in Ruggieri Senior Center for $37,000. The project, done by Continental Flooring Company, includes City Hall and the Contempo Resource Center. The total amount is $220,000.
  • Updated the position and salary of the Emergency Services Coordinator position. The position is shared with Newark and the city is paying for half of the salary costs. The salary range is from $8,062 to $9,793. The position title was changed from Emergency Preparation coordinator.
  • Approved funds for the city hall emergency generator line leak detector project.

 

City Reports:

  • Adopted Regional Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing (Regional AI) Choice. The Regional AI is a report on the barriers to fair housing and solutions to overcome those barriers. Issues included the hardships of finding housing for Section 8 voucher holders and the rate of homelessness countywide increasing to 42% since 2017. Solutions include regional policies that will promote new fair housing laws, finding ways to increase access to fair housing services by improving landlord education, and improving tenant screening services to avoid bias. The city plans to continue existing home repair and down payment assistance programs.

 

  • Concerns were raised about the CAREavan program being at the senior center for only three days a week. The homelessness parking program is in four other locations in the city. A resident commented about her continued efforts to bring the senior foot care program to the city.

 

City Council Reports:

  • Councilmember Duncan said Stop Waste is working on a county-wide ordinance on reusable foodware at sit-in restaurants. The item is pushed out to one year; pilots would be done in cities to see how businesses would handle the ordinance.
  • Mayor Dutra-Vernaci said the U.S. Conference of Mayors plan to hold a summer youth contest where participants would win iPads for completing online programs about money management.

 

Mayor Carol Dutra-Vernaci               Aye

Vice Mayor Emily Duncan                 Aye

Gary Singh                                          Aye

Pat Gacoscos                                       Aye

Jaime Patiño                                        Aye

 

 

University of California delays vote on raising tuition

AP Wire Service

 

SAN FRANCISCO (AP), Jan 21– The University of California has delayed a contentious vote originally planned for Wednesday on whether to raise tuition at UC's 10 campuses.

 

The office of UC President Janet Napolitano issued a statement Tuesday saying it had decided to move a vote by the UC Board of Regents on two tuition proposals to a later date. It did not specify when.

 

“We understand and take seriously the concerns by students who have requested more time to consider the proposed plans and welcome ongoing productive conversations with them,“ the statement said.

 

Also Tuesday, Gov. Gavin Newsom objected to the tuition hikes, signaling a potential political tug-of-war with the state's prestigious university system.

 

“Given the major increase in higher education funding provided in last year's budget and the similar increase proposed by Gov. Newsom for next year's budget, he believes that the proposed tuition increase is unwarranted, bad for students and inconsistent with our college affordability goals,“ Newsom spokesman Jesse Melgar said in a statement.

 

Newsom's proposed 2020-21 budget, which he announced Jan. 10, includes more than $217 million in permanent new funding for the UC system, in addition to $55.3 million in one-time funding for UC programs.

 

In his opening budget proposal, Newsom stipulates that the increased funding is based on “the expectation that UC will continue to focus on maintaining college affordability“ and other goals, including increasing student access and improving rates of timely degree completion.

 

The Board of Regents was scheduled to discuss and then vote on two proposals for raising undergraduate tuition at a meeting Wednesday. One plan calls for raising tuition and fees for all students annually by the cost of inflation. That would amount to a projected 2.8% increase of $348 over last year, to $12,918 for fall 2020.

 

The second plan would raise tuition and fees once for each incoming class but keep those costs flat for six years. Under that plan, the costs for the entering class of 2020-21 would increase over last year by 4.8%, or $606, to $13,176 for California undergraduates. Tuition for existing students would be frozen at current levels.

 

Napolitano has recommended that the regents approve either of the plans so prospective students can “make informed enrollment decisions,” according to a UC memo.

 

The memo expressed appreciation for Newsom's proposed funding increase but said the university system needs more money to cover an ambitious plan to increase undergraduate enrollment, make long-neglected repairs to infrastructure, address faculty and staff salary gaps, strengthen mental health services, build new classrooms, dorms and labs and cover rising pension and health costs.