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April 22, 2014 > City of Fremont Briefs

City of Fremont Briefs

Submitted By Cheryl Golden

Landmark Trees of the City of Fremont
We have recently completed a major overhaul and upgrade to one of the CityÕs significant historical documents: The Landmark Tree List. Originally hand-typed in 1973, the list is now an easy to use photographic reference guide to the CityÕs Landmark Tree locations, condition, and history. The Landmark Trees can be accessed at www.Fremont.gov/LandmarkTrees.

Landmark trees support FremontÕs urbanized landscape with history and beauty. If youÕve ever visited to the Shinn Historical Park and Arboretum, youÕve seen the large buttress roots of the Moreton Bay Fig tree and the wide Boulevard past rows of towering Mexican Fan Palms. Have you taken a walk around Niles Community Park lately? If so, youÕve most likely seen a group of large Bald Cypress trees thriving in the pondÕs waters. Or maybe youÕve wondered why the Mission San Jose community has so many Olive trees lining its streets.

Fremont is home to numerous Landmark trees that decorate the city with heritage. The location of landmark trees in Fremont often coincide with historical farms, ranches, nurseries, orchards and wineries that were once owned by early pioneer families such as Shinn, Rock, Stanford, Chadbourne, Vallejo, and Patterson. Despite changing landscapes and urban development, landmark trees are easily accessible since many are located on historical parks and public areas.

The first effort to create a landmark tree list was in 1970 by the City Beautiful Committee and the City of Fremont, following the adoption of the Tree Preservation Ordinance (FMC 4-5112) in 1966 to promote and encourage the preservation of trees. In 1972, 60 trees were surveyed and preserved by City Council Resolution. Almost 40 years later, in August 2010, the CityÕs landmark trees were revisited, re-surveyed and its findings were published in an updated booklet made available to the public. Several of the original 60 trees did not survive the test of time, but the remaining continues to thrive and tower over FremontÕs transformed landscape. On June 19, 2012, the Fremont City Council approved 23 trees to be newly designated with landmark status.

As of today, there are 85 landmark tree specimens within the City of Fremont. Information about the ordinance and criteria for landmark trees can be found at www.Fremont.gov/LandmarkTrees.

Trees play a major role in providing and maintaining future identity with the community. Are you curious to learn more about landmark trees or to find out if there are any in your neighborhood? Check out the Landmark Trees of the City of Fremont publication at www.Fremont.gov/LandmarkTrees.


The Crown Jewel of Fremont
Central Park is often referred to as the ÒCrown Jewel of Fremont,Ó with 450 scenic acres of park in the heart of Fremont and numerous amenities throughout. In addition to the 2-mile pathway around the water, there are basketball courts, a dog park, an exercise course, a golf driving range, playgrounds for children, the opportunity to fish, and outdoor sports being played on soccer and softball fields and tennis courts.

In mid- to late-spring, the park becomes even more alive with the 80-acre lake open in April for people-powered crafts and the Aqua Adventure Water Park opening for regular weekend business on Memorial Day weekend in late May. At Lake Elizabeth, there is a place to launch or rent a paddle boat, kayak or stand-up paddle board. And while on land, the snack bar is a favorite among visitors.

We offer many natural sciences and environmental education opportunities through our Junior Ranger day camp program, Nature Learning Center Open Houses and special events. Also, the Environmental Services Division hosts hundreds of school children throughout the year. Group picnic sites are available to reserve year-round for a fee, serving groups from 30 to 500. The spring and summer months are very, very busy so get your reservations in early! There are also drop-in picnic areas that a small group or family can use without much notice.

For more information about Central Park offerings, including reservation forms, visit www.Fremont.gov/CentralPark. You may also call (510) 790-5541 between 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week or stop by the Central Park Visitor Center at 40000 Paseo Padre Pkwy. (off Sailway Drive) right next to the boat launch to fill out and turn in reservation forms.


Meditations and Breathing with Smita Govil
The Powerful Guided Meditations courses offered through the City of Fremont Recreation Services helps us understand our core beliefs and worries so we can concentrate on our highest good now. We practice and learn Meditations that help us move thoughts and emotions toward a more creative and positive direction. We learn and practice Meditations and Breathing exercises that help us silence the constant inner chatter and help us silence our minds.

In the silence of mind, we experience the greater truth, and we see with greater awareness. The ancient wisdom of the world also says that we have different layers of illusion where we get trapped, and these illusions limit the understanding of our existence. With Meditations, Breathwork, Yoga, Spiritual knowledge and Wisdom, we connect to the infinite and pure consciousness, which is the seed potential of so many beautiful possibilities commonly called the Self.

For more information about Meditations and Breathing with Smita Govil, contact Sheri at ssmith@fremont.gov or (510) 791-4318. Check our Recreation Guide for more classes and details at www.Fremont.gov/RecGuide or register at www.RegeRec.com.

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